The Iran Deal: Consequences and Alternatives

August 14, 2015

In his testimony before the Senate Armed Services Committee, Richard Nathan Haass analyses the nuclear deal with Iran and suggests that any vote by Congress to approve the pact should be linked to legislation or a White House statement that makes clear what the United States would do if there were Iranian non-compliance, what would be intolerable in the way of Iran’s long-term nuclear growth, and what the U.S. was prepared to do to counter Iranian threats to U.S. interests and friends in the Region.

Statement by Richard Nathan Haass

President, Council on Foreign Relations

Before the Committee on Armed Services of the United States Senate on August 4, 2015

1st Session, 114th Congress

Richard Nathan Haass

Mr. Chairman: Thank you for this opportunity to speak about the “Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action” (JCPOA) signed on July 14 by representatives of the five permanent members of the UN Security Council, Germany, and Iran. I want to make it clear that what you are about to hear are my personal views and should not be interpreted as representing the Council on Foreign Relations, which takes no institutional positions.

The agreement with Iran, like any agreement, is a compromise, filled with elements that are attractive from the vantage point of US national security as well as elements that are anything but.

A simple way of summarizing the pact and its consequences is that at its core the accord represents a strategic tradeoff. On one hand, the agreement places significant limits on what Iran is permitted to do in the nuclear realm for the next ten to fifteen years. But these limits, even if respected in full, come at a steep price.

The agreement almost certainly facilitates Iran’s efforts to promote its national security objectives throughout the region (many of which are inconsistent with our own) over that same period. And second, the agreement does not resolve the problems posed by Iran’s actual and potential nuclear capabilities. Many of these problems will become greater as we approach the ten year point (when restrictions on the quantity and quality of centrifuges come to an end) and its fifteen year point (when restrictions pertaining to the quality and quantity of enriched uranium also end).

I was not a participant in the negotiations; nor was I privy to its secrets. My view is that a better agreement could and should have materialized. But this debate is better left to historians. I will as a result address the agreement that exists. I would say at the outset it should be judged on its merits rather than on hopes it might lead (to borrow a term used by George Kennan in another context) to a mellowing of Iran. This is of course possible, but the agreement also could have just the opposite effect. We cannot know whether Iran will be transformed, much less how or how much. So the only things that makes sense to do now is to assess the agreement as a transaction and to predict as carefully as possible what effects it will likely have on Iran’s capabilities as opposed to its intentions.

I want to focus on three areas: on the nuclear dimension as detailed in the agreement; on the regional; and on nuclear issues over the longer term.

There is understandable concern as to whether Iran will comply with the letter and spirit of the agreement. Compliance cannot be assumed given Iran’s history of misleading the IAEA, the lack of sufficient data provided as to Iran’s nuclear past, the time permitted Iran to delay access to inspectors after site-specific concerns are raised, and the difficulty likely to be experienced in reintroducing sanctions. My own prediction is that Iran may be tempted to cut corners and engage in retail but not wholesale non-compliance lest it risk the reintroduction of sanctions and/or military attack. I should add that I come to this prediction in part because I believe that Iran benefits significantly from the accord and will likely see it in its own interest to mostly comply. But this cannot be assumed and may be wrong, meaning the United States, with as many other governments as it can persuade to go along, should both make Iran aware of the penalties for non-compliance and position itself to implement them if need be. I am assuming that the response to sustained non-compliance would be renewed sanctions and that any military action on our part would be reserved to an Iranian attempt at breaking out and fielding one or more nuclear weapons.

The regional dimension is more complex and more certain to be problem. Iran is an imperial power that seeks a major and possibly dominant role in the region. Sanctions relief will give it much greater means to pursue its goals, including helping minority and majority Shi’ite populations in neighboring countries, arming and funding proxies such as Hezbollah and Hamas, propping up the government in Damascus, and adding to sectarianism in Iraq by its unconditional support of the government and Shia militias. The agreement could well extend the Syrian civil war, as Iran will have new resources with which to back the Assad government. I hope that Iran will see that Assad’s continuation in power only fuels a conflict that provides recruiting opportunities for the Islamic State, which Iranian officials rightly see as a threat to themselves and the region. Unfortunately, such a change in thinking and policy is a long shot at best.

The United States needs to develop a policy for the region that can deal with a more capable, aggressive Iran. To be more precise, though, it is unrealistic to envision a single or comprehensive US policy for a part of the world that is and will continue to be afflicted by multiple challenges. As I have written elsewhere, the Middle East is in the early throes of what appears to be a modern day 30 Years War in which politics and religion will fuel conflict within and across boundaries for decades, resulting in a Middle East that looks very different from the one the world has grown familiar with over the past century.

I will put forward approaches for a few of these challenges. In Iraq, I would suggest the United States expand its intelligence, military, economic, and political ties with both the Kurds and Sunni tribes in the West. Over time, this has the potential to result in gradual progress in the struggle against the Islamic State.

Prospects for progress in Syria are poorer. The effort to build a viable opposition to both the government and various groups including but not limited to the Islamic State promises to be slow, difficult, anything but assured of success. A diplomatic push designed to produce a viable successor government to the Assad regime is worth exploring and, if possible, implementing. European governments likely would be supportive; the first test will be to determine Russian receptivity. If this is forthcoming, then a Joint approach to Iran would be called for.

I want to make two points here. First, as important as it would be to see the Assad regime ousted, there must be high confidence in the viability of its successor. Not only would Russia and Iran insist on it, but the United States should as well. Only with a viable successor can there be confidence the situation would not be exploited by the Islamic State and result in the establishment of a caliphate headquartered in Damascus and a massacre of Alawites and Christians. Some sort of a multinational force may well be essential.

Second, such a scenario assumes a diplomatic approach to Iran. This should cause no problems here or elsewhere. Differences with Iran in the nuclear and other realms should not preclude diplomatic explorations and cooperation where it can materialize because interests are aligned. Syria is one such possibility, as is Afghanistan. But such diplomatic overtures should not stop the United States acting, be it to interdict arms shipments from Iran to governments or non-state actors; nor should diplomatic outreach in any way constrain the United States from speaking out in reaction to internal political developments within Iran. New sanctions should also be considered when Iran takes steps outside the nuclear realms but still judged to be detrimental to other US interests.

Close consultations will be required with Saudi Arabia over any number of policies, including Syria. But three subjects in particular should figure in US-Saudi talks. First, the United States needs to work to discourage Saudi Arabia and others developing a nuclear option to hedge against what Iran might do down the road. A Middle East with nuclear materials in the hands of warring, potentially unstable regimes would be a nightmare. This could involve assurances as to what will not be tolerated (say, enrichment above a specified level) when it comes to Iran as well as calibrated security guarantees to Saudi Arabia and others.

Second, the Saudis should be encouraged to reconsider their current ambitious policy in Yemen, which seems destined to be a costly and unsuccessful distraction. The Saudi government would be wiser to concentrate on contending with internal threats to its security. And thirdly, Washington and Riyadh should maintain a close dialogue on energy issues as lower oil prices offer one way of limiting Iran’s capacity to pursue programs and policies detrimental to US and Saudi interests.

The agreement with Iran does not alter the reality that Egypt is pursuing a political trajectory unlikely to result in sustained stability or that Jordan will need help in coping with a massive refugee burden. Reestablishing strategic trust with Israel is a must, as is making sure it as well as other friends in the region have what they need to deal with threats to their security. (It matters not whether the threats come from Iran, the Islamic State, or elsewhere.) The United States should also step up its criticism of Turkey for both attacking the Kurds and for allowing its territory to be used as a pipeline for recruits to reach Syria and join the Islamic State.

The third area of concern linked to the nuclear pact with Iran stems from its medium and long-term capabilities in the nuclear realm. It is necessary but not sufficient that Iran not be permitted to assemble one or more nuclear bombs. It is also necessary that it not be allowed to develop the ability to field a large arsenal of weapons with little or no warning. This calls for consultations with European and regional governments to begin sooner rather than later on a follow-on agreement to the current JCPOA. The use of sanctions, covert action, and military force should also be addressed in this context.

I am aware that members of Congress have the responsibility to vote on the Iran agreement. As I have said, it is a flawed agreement. But the issue before the Congress is not whether the agreement is good or bad but whether from this point on the United States is better or worse off with it. It needs to be recognized that passage of a resolution of disapproval (presumably overriding a presidential veto) entails several Major drawbacks.

First, it would allow Iran to resume nuclear activity in an unconstrained manner, increasing the odds the United States would be faced with a decision – possibly as soon as this year or next – as to whether to tolerate the emergence of a threshold or actual nuclear weapons state or use military force against it.

Second, by acting unilaterally at this point, the United States would make itself rather than Iran the issue. In this vein, imposing unilateral sanctions would hurt Iran but not enough to make it alter the basics of ist nuclear program. Third, voting the agreement down and calling for a reopening of negotiations with the aim of producing a better agreement is not a real option as there would insufficient international support for so doing. Here, again, the United States would likely isolate itself, not Iran. And fourth, voting down the agreement would reinforce questions and doubts around the world as to American political divisions and dysfunction. Reliability and predictability are essential attributes for a great power that must at one and the same time both reassure and deter.

The alternative to voting against the agreement is obviously to vote for it. The problem with a simple vote that defeats a resolution of disapproval and that expresses unconditional support of the JCPOA is that it does not address the serious problems the agreement either exacerbated or failed to resolve.

So let me suggest a third path. What I would encourage members to explore is whether a vote for the pact (against a resolution of disapproval) could be associated or linked with policies designed to address and compensate for the weaknesses and likely adverse consequences of the agreement. I can imagine such assurances in the form of legislation voted on by the Congress and signed by the president or a communication from the president to the Congress, possibly followed up by a joint resolution. Whatever the form, it would have to deal with either what the United States would not tolerate or what the United States would do in the face of Iranian non-compliance with the recent agreement, Iran’s long-term nuclear growth, and Iranian regional activities.

Mr. Chairman, thank you again for asking me to meet with you and your colleagues here today. I of course look forward to any questions or comments you may have.

Advertisements

U.S. President Barack Obama campaigns for Iran Nuclear Deal

August 5, 2015

U.S. President Barack Obama will defend last month’s agreement on Iran’s nuclear program in a speech at American University in Washington DC today. Obama is expected to argue that the decision before the U.S. Congress on the nuclear deal is the country’s most important foreign policy debate since the authorization of the Iraq war.

iran nuclear deal

The ministers of foreign affairs of France, Germany, the European Union, Iran, the United Kingdom and the United States as well as Chinese and Russian diplomats announcing the framework for a Comprehensive agreement on the Iranian nuclear programme (Lausanne, 2 April 2015). Photo: United States Department of State

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry received the support of Gulf allies. “We did a nuclear deal. We exclusively looked at how do you take the most immediate threat away from them in order to protect the region. And if we’re going to push back against an Iran that is behaving in these ways, it is better to push back on an Iran that doesn’t have a nuclear weapons than one that does,” said U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry in an interview with the Atlantic‘s Jeffrey Goldberg.

The U.S. Congress has until September 17, 2015, vote on the deal.

Read full story.


Von Winnetou zu Obama – Die Deutschen und der edle Wilde

January 11, 2014

von Tomas Spahn

Der Autor ist ein in Hamburg lebender Publizist und Politikwissenschaftler.

Ein roter Held

Winnetou ist ein Idol meiner Kindheit. Er stand für all das, was wir als Kinder sein wollten. Und vielleicht auch sein sollten.

Winnetou war ein Held. Nicht so einer von diesen Deppen, die laut schreiend in der ersten Reihe der Kriegsmaschinerie auf den Feind losrennen, um dann aufgebahrt und mit Orden versehen zwecks Beerdigung zu den Angehörigen zurück geschickt zu werden. Nein, ein echter Held. Obgleich – ganz zum Schluss … nein. Auch da bleibt Winnetou ein wahrer Held. Nicht einer, der sich mit Hurra für irgendeine imaginäre Idee wie Volk und Vaterland opfert, sondern einer, der mit Bedacht sein eigenes Leben für andere einsetzt, wohl ahnend, dass er es verlieren wird.

Dieser Tod eines wahren Helden aber ist es nicht allein.

Winnetou ist zuverlässig und pünktlich. Er verpasst keine Verabredung, und ist er doch  dazu gezwungen, so lässt er seinen Partner die alternativlosen Gründe wissen und gibt ihm Mitteilung, wann und wo das Treffen nachgeholt werden kann.

Winnetou ist uneingeschränkt ehrlich. Niemals würde er jemanden betrügen. Das ist einfach unter seiner Würde.

Winnetou ist gerecht. Niemals würde er gegen jemanden etwas unternehmen, der nichts gegen ihn unternommen hat.

Winnetou ist edelmütig. Er vergibt seinem Feind, selbst wenn dieser ihm das Leben nehmen wollte.

Winnetou ist altruistisch. Er opfert am Ende alles, was er hat, für andere. Ungerechtfertigt Böses tun – das kann Winnetou  nicht.

Winnetou ist nicht rassistisch. Er hilft jedem, der der Hilfe bedarf, unabhängig von dessen Rasse. Sogar dem Neger, der doch, wie Winnetous Erfinder Karl May nicht müde wird zu erwähnen, aus Sicht der Rasse des Winnetou weit unter diesem steht.

Und damit kommen wir zu dem, was Winnetou nicht ist.

Winnetou ist kein Weißer. Er ist ein Roter. Oder besser: Mitglied der indianischen Rasse, die, wie May betont, gleichsam gottgewollt zum Aussterben verdammt ist. Seine indianische Abstammung macht Winnetou unterscheidbar und es liefert eine Grundlage dafür, Menschen aufgrund ihrer Rasse in Schubladen zu stecken. May topft ihn zur Tarnung um, als Winnetou mit ihm Nordafrika bereist. Aus dem Athapasken, dem Apachen, wird ein Somali. Wohl bemerkt: Ein Somali – kein Neger. Denn offenbar sind Somali für May keine Schwarzen. Zumindest sind sie für ihn keine „Neger“.

Winnetou ist nicht zivilisiert. Er ist das, was man in der zweiten Hälfte des neunzehnten Jahrhunderts – und darüber hinaus – unter einem Wilden verstand. Oder besser: Winnetou war als Wilder geboren worden. Und als Indianer blieb er es bis zu seinem Tode. Nicht aber als Mensch.

Winnetou wohnt nicht in Städten. Obgleich der Pueblo-Bau, den May irrtümlich als seinen Heimatort vorstellt – denn die Apachen waren keine Pueblo-Indianer – eine städtische Struktur bereits erahnen lässt.

Winnetou geht keiner geregelten Arbeit nach. Er ist der Häuptling seines spezifischen Apachenstammes der Mescalero – und er wird von fast allen Stämmen der Apachen als ihr ideelles Oberhaupt anerkannt, was ebenfalls an der Wirklichkeit vorbei geht, da die südlichen Athapasken durchaus einander feindlich gesinnte Gruppen bildeten. Betrachtet man im Sinne Mays die Apachen als eine Nation, so ist Winnetou ein indianischer Kaiser. Entsprechend edel und rein ist sein Charakter – obgleich Karl May damit an der Wirklichkeit europäischer Kaiser meilenweit vorbeiläuft. Aber das steht auf einem anderen Blatt.

Winnetou zieht durch seine Welt, um Gutes zu tun. Da ist er ein wenig wie Jesus. Auch wenn er keine Wunder tut, so ist er doch alles in allem wunder-voll. In einem Satz:

Winnetou ist genau das, als was er in die Literatur eingehen sollte und eingegangen ist: Das Idealbild des Edlen Wilden. Oder?

Zwischen Romantik und Gründerzeit

Werfen wir einen Blick auf Winnetous Schöpfer, den Sachsen Karl May. Nur selten hat Deutschland einen derart phantasiebegabten Schriftsteller wie ihn hervorgebracht. Und jemanden, der so wie er selbst zu einer der Figuren wurde, die er in seinen Romanen beschrieb.

May war ein Kind seiner Zeit. Er war ein Romantiker, dessen kleine Biedermeierwelt über Nacht in das globale Weltgeschehen geschubst worden war. Seine gedankliche Reise in die scheinbare Realität fremder Länder ist dabei eher Schein als Sein. Er verarbeitete die neue Welt in seinen Romanen, immer auf der Suche nach dem Weg aus dem Biedermeier in eine neue Zeit, ohne dabei die Ideale seiner romantischen Introvertiertheit aufgeben zu wollen, aufgeben zu können.

May war obrigkeitsgläubig – und doch war er es nur so lange, wie die Obrigkeit das Richtige tat. Richtig war für May das, was aus seiner Interpretation des Christentums heraus Gottes Willen entsprach. Die Überzeugung, dass ein höheres Wesen die Geschicke der Welt lenke, ist unverrückbar mit May verknüpft. Aus diesem Glauben heraus muss das Gute immer siegen und das Böse immer verlieren, denn wäre es anders, hätte Mays Gott versagt. Das aber kann ein Gott nicht. Doch Mays Gott gibt dem Menschen Spielraum. Mays Gottesglaube ist nicht der an ein unverrückbares Schicksal. Der Mensch hat es selbst in der Hand, seine persönliche Nähe zu dem einen Gott zu gestalten. An dessen endgültigen Sieg über das Böse aber lässt May nie auch nur den Hauch eines Zweifels aufkommen.

Was für die mystische Welt des Glaubens gilt, gilt für May auch für die Politik. May war kaisertreu und undemokratisch. May macht dieses nicht an den Großen der Welt fest. Es ist sein Old Shatterhand oder sein Kara ben Nemsi, der undemokratisch agiert. Demokratie behindert seine Hauptakteure, behindert ihn in der Entscheidungsfindung. In den wenigen Fällen, in denen demokratische Mehrheitsentscheide die Position des Romanhelden überstimmen, endet dieses regelmäßig in einer Katastrophe. Dennoch war May nicht im eigentlichen Sinne totalitär, eher patriarchalisch. Er zwang niemanden, sich seinem Urteil zu unterwerfen, stellte allerdings gleichzeitig fest, dass er mit jenen, die dieses nicht taten, nichts mehr zu tun haben wolle, weil sie das Richtige nicht erkennten. Es ist in gewisser Weise ein alttestamentarischer Ansatz, den May vertritt. Die von der Natur – und damit von Gott – eingesetzte Führungsperson tut allein schon deshalb das Richtige, weil sie auf Gottes Wegen schreitet. Und weil dieses so ist, ist es selbstverständlich, dass alle anderen Vernünftigen dieser Führungsperson folgen. Auf die Unvernünftigen kann man dann gern verzichten.

May war nicht nur ein Großdeutscher – er war ein Gesamtdeutscher. Das war nicht selbstverständlich zu seiner Zeit, als das Zusammenbringen der Deutschen Kleinstaaten unter dem Preußischen König als Kaiser keine zwanzig Jahre zurück lag. Es war noch weniger selbstverständlich für einen Sachsen, dessen lebenslustiges Kleinreich immer wieder Opfer der asketischen Nachbarn im Norden geworden war. Doch May stand hier fest und unverrückbar in der Tradition der pangermanistischen Burschenschaften: „Von der Maaß bis an die Memel, von der Etsch bis an den Belt …”

May war auch Europäer. Trotz des noch nicht lange zurückliegenden Französisch-Preußischen Krieges, aus dem ein Kleindeutsch-Französischer wurde, stehen ihm von allen Europäern die Franzosen am nächsten. Dänen und Holländer gehören dagegen fast schon automatisch zur germanischen Familie. Und die Österreicher sowieso.

Insofern wird man May vielleicht am ehesten gerecht, wenn man ihn als Gemanopäer bezeichnet. Geschichtlich bewandert ging er davon aus, dass zumindest die westeuropäischen Völker sämtlichst germanischen Ursprungs waren, auch wenn bei den Südeuropäern der römische Einfluss unverkennbar blieb. Das einte.

May war kein Rassist. Zumindest nicht in dem Sinne, wie wir diesen Begriff heute verstehen. Und dennoch war er alles andere als frei von Rassevorurteilen. Wenn er das Bild des Negers aus der Sicht des Indianers zeichnet, dann zeichnet er damit auch sein eigenes. Für May ist der Bewohner Afrikas in gewisser Weise eine Art des menschlichen Urtypus. Ungebildet, unzivilisiert. Aber unzweifelhaft ein Mensch – keine Sache, die man zum Sklaven machen darf. Mays Neger kann mit Hilfe des zivilisierten Weißen in die Lage versetzt werden, zumindest Anschluss zu finden. Wenn er auch nie in der Lage sein wird, intellektuell an die Fähigkeiten des Weißen heranzureichen. Deswegen sprechen die Schwarzen, die bei Karl May auftreten, grundsätzlich ein Art Stammeldeutsch. Es hat etwas von Babysprache – und es charakterisiert damit gleichzeitig den May’schen Genotyp des Negers: Ausgestattet mit einen hohen Maß an emotionaler Wärme, aber unselbstständig und der permanenten Anleitung bedürftig. Gleichwohl anerkennt er – fast schon ungläubig – den militärischen Erfolg der südostafrikanischen Zulu.

Das ist bei dem Indianer anders. Als Leser spürt man den Unterschied zwischen roter und schwarzer Rasse ständig. Auch Mays Indianer bedürfen der lenkenden Führung durch den weißen Mann. Auch Mays Indianer sprechen eine Art Stammeldeutsch – aber es ist ein literarisches Stammeldeutsch. Anders als der Schwarze hat der Indianer das Potential, dem Weißen ebenbürtig zu werden. May erkennt, ohne dieses jemals explizit zuzugeben, dass der vorgebliche Wilde Amerikas eigentlich genau dieses nicht ist: Ein Wilder.

May anerkennt eine eigenständige, indianische Kultur, die nur des deutschen Einflusses bedarf, um sich auf die gleiche Stufe mit dem Deutschen zu erheben. Unterschwellig schwingt dabei immer das Bedauern mit, dass Deutschland viel zu spät seine weltrettende Mission entdeckt habe. Wären es Deutsche gewesen und nicht Angelsachsen, die den Norden Amerikas besiedelten – was hätte aus den Wilden werden können. Denn anders als Mays Neger sind seine Indianer eben nicht zivilisationslos.

Vom Romantiker zum Zivilisationskritiker

May selbst wird von Roman zu Roman mehr zum Zivilisationskritiker. Er, dessen Geschichten zwischen 1870 und 1910 entstanden, erkennt den brutalen Gegensatz zwischen den kommerziellen Interessen der angelsächsisch geprägten Yankees und den naturverbundenen, akapitalistischen Indianern, die für ihn immer weniger Wilde sind, sondern eine von unehrenhaften Interessen weißer Raubritter in ihrer Existenz bedrohte, eigene Zivilisation.

Den Wandel, den May in seinem Verhältnis zum Wilden Nordamerikas – und ausschließlich zu diesem – durchlebt, durchlebt auch seine Romanfigur. Zwei Deutsche sind es, die aus dem Naturkind Winnetou einen edlen Wilden formen – der 1848-Altrevolutionär Klekih-Petra und Mays romantisches Ich selbst. Bald schon ist Winnetou nur noch pro forma ein Wilder. Tatsächlich ist sein Verhalten in vielem deutlich zivilisierter als das der mit ihm konkurrierenden Weißen – zumindest soweit diese angelsächsischen Ursprungs sind. Und eigentlich ist Winnetou am Ende nicht einmal mehr ein Vertreter seiner „roten” Rasse. Er stirbt bei dem erfolgreichen Versuch, seine deutschen Freunde zu retten. Im Todeskampf singt ihm ein deutscher Chor ein letztes Lied, geleitet ihn in die Ewigkeit, die er, der einstmals Wilde, nun wie ein guter Deutscher als Christ betritt. „Schar-lih, ich glaube an den Heiland. Winnetou ist ein Christ.“ So lautet der letzte Satz, den der Sterbende spricht. May rettet seinen erdachten Blutsbruder so nicht nur für die Deutschen, er rettet ihn auch für das göttliche Himmelsreich. Winnetou, so diese letzte Botschaft seines Schöpfers, ist einer von uns. Er ist ein Deutscher. Ein guter Deutscher, denn er ist ein Christ. Ein edler Deutscher, denn er ist ein wahrer Christ. Er ist ein solcher Deutscher, wie ein Deutscher in Mays Idealbild eigentlich sein sollte.

Insofern ist jeder, der May dumpfen Rassismus vorwirft, auf dem Holzwege. Mag er in seinem Bild des Afrikaners von der zeitgenössisch vorherrschenden Auffassung des Negers als unterrichtungsbedürftigem Kind geprägt sein, mag seine konfessionell begründete Abneigung gegen Vertreter der Ostkirchen mehr noch als gegen Vertreter des Islam unverkennbar sein und mag er der Vorstellung seiner Zeit folgen, wonach die weiße Rasse von der Natur – und damit von Gott – dazu ausersehen sei, die Welt zu führen – mit der Figur des Winnetou öffnet er dem Wilden den Weg, zu einem Zivilisierten, zu einem Deutschen, zu werden. Vielleicht sogar etwas zu sein, das besser ist als ein Deutscher.

Trotzdem und gerade weil er in seinem inneren Kern nun ein Deutscher ist, bleibt Winnetou, diese wunderbare und idealisierte Schöpfung eines Übermenschen, im Bewusstsein seiner Leser die Inkarnation des edlen Wilden. Und sie verändert den Leser dabei selbst. Denn in dem zivilisierten Kind, dem angepassten Erwachsenen, entfaltet dieser edle Wilde eine eigene Wirkung. Wer in sich Gutes spürt, der wird den Versuch unternehmen, immer auch ein wenig wie Winnetou zu sein. Es ist diese gedachte Mischung aus unangepasster Ursprünglichkeit und geistig-kultureller Überlegenheit, aus instinktivem Gerechtigkeitsgefühl und dem charakterlichen Edelmut der gebildeten Stände, die ihre Faszination entfaltet. Sie machen den eigentlichen Kern des Winnetou aus.

Der wilde Deutsche und der deutsche Wilde

Indem May ab 1890 diese enge Verbundenheit zwischen dem Wilden aus dem Westen der USA nicht mit den Weißen, sondern mit den Deutschen herauskristallisiert und im wahrsten Sinne des Wortes romantisiert, stellt er unterschwellig fest: Wir sind uns ähnlicher, als wir glauben. Ohne explizit England-feindlich zu sein, verdammt May so auch die imperialistische Landnahme aus kommerziellen Interessen, verurteilt den englischen Expansionismus, indem er ihn zu einer Grundeigenschaft der europäischen Nordamerikaner macht.

In gewisser Weise wird so auch der Einstieg des den jungen May darstellenden Old Shatterhand zu einer Allegorie. Als Kind der europäischen Zivilisation hat er kein Problem damit, im Auftrag der Landdiebe tätig zu werden, die eine transkontinentale Bahnverbindung durch das Apachenland führen wollen. Das historische Vorbild wird May in der ab 1880 geplanten Southern Pacific Verbindung gefunden haben. Erst Stück für Stück wird dem Romanhelden das Verbrecherische seiner Tat bewusst – in der Konfrontation mit jenen Wilden, deren Land geraubt werden soll und geraubt werden wird und die sich dennoch schon hier als die edleren Menschen erweisen, indem sie ihrem dann weißen Bruder die Genehmigung geben, die Ergebnisse seiner Arbeit, die ausschließlich dem Ziel dienen, sie, die rechtlosen Wilden, zu bedrängen, an die Landdiebe zu verkaufen und damit seinen Vertrag zu erfüllen.

Um wie viel einfacher wäre es gewesen, Scharlih, wie sich May von seinen erdachten Brüdern nennen lässt, das Gold zu geben, das den Ausfall der Entlohnung hätte ersetzen können. Doch auch hier bleibt der Hochstapler May ein guter Deutscher: pacta sunt servanda.

Gleichwohl manifestiert sich hier der Bruch des Schriftstellers zwischen der deutschen Kultur und der angelsächsischen. Wir, die Deutschen, sind keine Imperialisten. Wir, die Deutschen, sind nicht die Räuber. Wir sind vielmehr jene, die den Wilden dabei helfen, so zu werden wie wir bereits sind. Das ist in einer Zeit, die geprägt war vom Bewusstsein der absoluten Überlegenheit der weißen Rasse, fast schon revolutionär. Und es war gleichzeitig reaktionär, weil es dennoch die Unterlegenheit der Kulturen der Wilden als selbstverständlich voraussetzte. Darüber hinaus liefert May eine perfekte Begründung des einsetzenden deutschen Kolonialismus.

Nicht Gewinnstreben ist des Deutschen Ziel in der Welt der Landräuber, sondern Zivilisationsvermittlung. Wir, diese Deutschen, gehen nicht in die Welt, um Land zu stehlen oder Menschen zu unterwerfen – unsere Ziele sind hehr, und wenn wir auf andere Völker treffen, dann ist es unser Ziel, sie auf die gleiche Ebene der Kultur zu heben, über die wir selbst verfügen. In gewisser Weise entspricht dieses dem Weltbild, das Mays Kaiser am 2. Juli 1900 seinem Expeditionsheer mit auf den Weg nach China gibt: „Ihr habt gute Kameradschaft zu halten mit allen Truppen, mit denen ihr dort zusammenkommt. … wer es auch sei, sie fechten alle für die eine Sache, für die Zivilisation.“ Wilhelm II. war bereit, für diese Zivilisation auch den Massenmord zu befehlen. Das unterschied ihn vom gereiften May.

Den Umgang des belgischen Königs Leopold 2 mit „seinem” Kongo muss May – sollte er um ihn gewusst haben – ebenso zutiefst verurteilt haben, wie ihm die Versklavung der „armen Neger” durch die Araber und die Türken ein Gräuel war. Spätestens der Völkermord an den Herero im deutschen Südwestafrika, der eine erschreckende Ähnlichkeit mit dem einzigen Massenmord des Winnetou im zweiten Teil der Winnetou-Trilogie aufweist, widersprach diesem Ideal eklatant. May selbst äußerte sich dazu nicht mehr  – vielleicht auch deshalb, weil er selbst dieser Welt schon zu entrückt war. Seine einzige Geschichte, die im Süden Afrikas spielt, fällt als Ich-Erzählung des 1842 in Radebeul geborenen Schriftstellers in die späten 1830er Jahre. Seinen letzten Roman hatte May 1910 veröffentlicht – seit 1900 waren seine Erzählungen nicht mehr wirklich von dieser Welt.

Doch das Bild des Edlen Wilden sollte sich dank May unverrückbar im kollektiven deutschen Unterbewusstsein verankern. Es war seitdem immer fest mit dem nordamerikanischen „Wilden“ verknüpft und bot einer Verklärung Vorschub, die manchmal fast schon pseudoreligiösen Charakter annahm. Winnetou blieb unserem Bewusstsein erhalten. Sollte er jemals in die Gefahr geraten sein, vergessen zu werden, so holten ihn die zahllosen B-Movies, die mit einer Titelfigur seines Namens in Annäherung an manchen Inhalt des Karl May in den sechziger Jahren des zwanzigsten Jahrhunderts produziert wurden, zurück in seine rund achtzig Jahre zuvor gedachte Rolle. Zwanzig Jahre nach Kriegsende, nach dieser vernichtenden Niederlage der Deutschen gegen das Angelsächsische, gab dieser Winnetou den moralisch zerstörten Deutschen erneut das Bild einer moralischen Instanz – und auch hier wieder ist der Edle Wilde am Ende mehr der edle Deutsche als der Amerikaner. Was Karl May nicht einmal erahnen konnte – nach der Fast-Vernichtung des Deutschen wurde sein Romanheld derjenige, der unverfänglich weil eben in seiner Herkunft nicht Deutsch die deutschen Tugenden aufgreifen und repräsentieren konnte. Die Tatsache, dass die Filmfigur von einem Franzosen gespielt wurde, unterstrich die Unangreifbarkeit des Deutschen in dieser Figur des Edlen Wilden.

Das Bild vom guten Amerikaner

Winnetou und mit ihm May prägte erneut das Bild einer Generation von dem edlen Uramerikaner, indem er diesen zum eigentlichen Träger deutscher Primärtugenden verklärte. War auch der Yankee in den sechziger Jahren noch derjenige, der, je nach Sichtweise, Deutschland von Hitler befreit oder entscheidend zur Niederlage Deutschlands beigetragen hatte – wobei das eine wie das andere nicht voneinander zu trennen war  – so war der von den Yankees bedrängte Wilde doch das eigentliche Opfer eben dieses Yankee, der immer weniger das Wohl des anderen als vielmehr das eigene im Auge hatte. Unbewusst schlich sich so in die Winnetou-Filme auch eine unterschwellige Kritik am Yankee-Kapitalismus ein, ohne dass man sie deswegen als anti-amerikanisch hätte bezeichnen können. Ob in den Romanen oder in den nachempfundenen Filmen gilt: Die wirklich Bösen, die moralisch Verwerflichen sind niemals Deutsche. Sind es nicht ohnehin schon durch und durch verderbte Kreaturen, deren konkrete Nationalität keine Rolle spielt, so sind es skrupellose Geschäftsleute mit unzweifelhaftem Yankee-Charakter. Vielleicht war dieses auch ein ausschlaggebender Grund, weshalb die DDR-Führung, die mit dem kaisertreuen Sachsen wenig anzufangen wusste, darauf verzichtete, seine Bücher aus den Regalen zu verbannen.

Im Westen Deutschlands verklärte der Blick auf die vor der Tür stehende imperialistische Sowjetarmee das Bild des Amerikaners. War die Deutsch-Sowjetische Freundschaft in den mitteldeutschen Ländern eine staatliche Order, die kaum gelebt wurde, so wurde die deutsch-amerikanische Freundschaft im Westen zu einer gelebten Wirklichkeit. Ähnlich wie schon zu Mays Zeiten zeichnete sich der Deutsche einmal mehr durch ein gerüttelt Maß an Naivität aus. Er verwechselte Interessengemeinschaft zwischen Staaten mit Freundschaft zwischen Völkern.

Uncle Sam, der schon auf seinem Rekrutierungsplakat aus dem Ersten Weltkrieg Menschen fing, um sie für ihr Land in den Tod zu schicken, wurde im Bewusstsein der Nachkriegsdeutschen/West nicht zuletzt dank Marshall-Plan zum altruistischen Onkel Sam aus Amerika.

Das verklärte Bild des US-Amerikaners Winnetou, dieses Edlen Wilden, der so viele erwünschte deutsche Eigenschaften in sich trug, mag dieser Idealisierung Vorschub geleistet haben. Die Tatsache, dass bei der US-amerikanischen Nachkriegspolitik selbstverständlich immer US-Interessen den entscheidenden Ausschlag gaben, wurde von den Deutschen/West gezielt verdrängt. In der ihnen eigenen Gemütlichkeit, für das die angelsächsische Sprache kein Pendant kennt, verklärten sie den früheren Kriegsgegner erst zum Retter und dann zum Freund. Doch die Verklärung sollte Risse bekommen. Und der Entscheidende entstand in jenen sechziger Jahren, die auch die Wiederauferstehung des Winnetou feierten.

Mochte die deutsche Volksseele den US-amerikanischen Kampf in Vietnam anfangs noch als Rettungsaktion vor feindlicher Diktatur gesehen haben – die unmittelbare Position an einer der zu erwartenden Hauptkampflinien zwischen den Systemen vermochte diese Auffassung ebenso zu befördern wie der immer noch im Hinterkopf steckende zivilisatorische Anspruch an Kolonisierung – so wurde, je länger der Krieg dauerte, desto deutlicher, dass es nicht nur hehre Ziele waren, die die USA bewegten, sich in Vietnam zu engagieren. Das Bild vom lieben Onkel Sam aus Amerika bekam Flecken. Mehr und mehr erinnerte das US-amerikanische Vorgehen gegen die unterbewaffneten Dschungelkämpfer der Vietkong und Massaker wie das von MyLai an die Einsätze der US-Kavallerie gegen zahlenmäßig und waffentechnisch unterlegene Stämme der indigenen Amerikaner. Die indianischen Aktionen, die 1973 das Massaker von Wounded Knee in Erinnerung brachten, taten ein weiteres, um die unrühmliche Geschichte der Kolonisierung des Westens der USA in Erinnerung zu rufen.

Sahen sich die deutschen Konservativen fest an der Seite ihrer transatlantischen Freunde im globalen Kampf des Guten gegen das Böse, so verklärte die Linke den Dschungelkämpfer zu edlen Wilden, die sich mit dem Mut der Verzweiflung gegen die Kolonialismuskrake des Weltkapitalismus zur Wehr setzte. Idealbildern, die mit der Wirklichkeit wenig zu tun hatten, folgten beide.

Zu einem tiefen Graben sollte dieser in Vietnam entstandene Riss werden, als mit Bush 2 die Marionette des Yankee-Kapitalismus in einen Krieg ums Öl zog. Hier nun war es wieder, das Bild des ausschließlich auf seinen Profit bedachten Yankee – das Bild des hässlichen Amerikaners, der den Idealen des guten Deutschen so fern stand, dass in den Augen der Deutschen der von ihm bedrängte Wilde allemal der wertvollere Mensch war. In diese Situation, die ein fast schon klassisches Karl-May-Bild zeichnete, platzte 2009 die Wahl des Barack Obama als 44. Präsident der Vereinigten Staaten.

Vom Mulatten zum Messias

Dieser im traditionellen Sinne als Mulatte zu bezeichnende Mann, dessen schwarzafrikanischer Vater aus Kenia und dessen Mutter als klassisch amerikanische Nachkommin von Iren, Engländern und Deutschen aus dem kleinstbürgerlich geprägten Kernland der USA stammte, entfachte bei den Deutschen etwas, das ich als positivistischen Rassismus bezeichnen möchte. Allen voran der Anchorman der wichtigsten öffentlich-rechtlichen Newsshow wurde nicht müde, diesen „ersten farbigen Präsidenten der USA” in den höchsten Tönen zu feiern. Wie sehr er und mit ihm alle, die in das gleiche Horn stießen, ihren tief in ihnen verankerten Rassismus auslebten, wurde ihnen nie bewusst. Denn tatsächlich ist die Reduzierung des Mulatten, der ebenso weiß wie schwarz ist, auf seinen schwarzen Teil nichts anderes als eine gedankliche Fortsetzung nationalsozialistischer Rassegesetze. Der Deutsche, dessen Eltern zur Hälfte arisch und zur anderen Hälfte semitisch – oder eben zur einen Hälfte deutsch und zur anderen Hälfte jüdisch – waren, wurde auf seinen jüdischen Erbteil reduziert. Als vorgeblicher Mischling zweier Menschenrassen  – als „Bastard” – durfte er eines nicht mehr sein: Weißer, Arier, Europäer, Deutscher. Wenn der Nachrichtenmoderator den Mulatten Obama auf seine schwarzafrikanischen Gene reduzierte, mag man dieses vielleicht noch damit zu begründen versuchen, dass die äußere Anmutung des US-Präsidenten eher der eines schwarzen als der eines weißen Amerikaners entspricht. Aber auch dieses offenbart bereits den unterschwelligen Rassismus, der sich bei der deutschen Berichterstattung über Obama Bahn gebrochen hatte.

Ich sprach von einem positivistischen Rassismus – was angesichts der innerdeutschen Rassismusdebatte, die zwangsläufig aus dem Negerkuss einen Schaumkuss und aus dem „schwarzen Mann” des Kinderspiels einen Neger macht, fast schon wie ein Oxymoron wirkt. Doch der Umgang mit dem noch nicht und dem frisch gewählten Obama offenbarte genau diesen positivistischen Rassismus. Indem er den weißen Anteil ausblendete, schob er das möglicherweise Negative im Charakter dieses Mannes ausschließlich auf dessen „weiße“ Gene – und aus dem kollektiven Bewusstsein. Als Schwarzer – denn ein Neger durfte er nicht mehr sein – löste Obama sich von all dem, was die Deutschen an Yankeeismus an ihren transatlantischen „Freunden” kritisierten. Als aus dem schwarzen US-Amerikaner der erste farbige US-Präsident wurde, konnte das immer noch in deutschen Hinterköpfen herumspukende Idealbild des im Norden Amerikas anzutreffenden Edlen Wilden seinen direkten Weg finden zur Verknüpfung des eigentlich schon deutschen Winnetou mit dem nicht-weißen Nordamerikaner Obama. Der Mulatte wurde zur lebenden Inkarnation der May’schen Romanfigur. Den Schritt vom unzivilisierten zum zivilisierten Wilden hatte er bereits hinter sich. Zumindest der nordamerikanische Neger saß nicht mehr als Sklave in einer Hütte an den Baumwollfeldern, um tumb und ungebildet sein Dasein zu fristen. Er war in der weißen Zivilisation angekommen. Aber er war kein Yankee – und er war auch nicht der „Uncle Sam“, der den Deutschen vorschwebte, wenn er an „den Ami“ dachte.

Mit seinem eloquenten Auftreten, mit seiner so unverkennbar anderen Attitüde als der der Yankee-Inkarnation Georg Walker Bush, wurde dieser Barack Obama im Bewusstsein seiner deutschen Fans zu einem würdigen Nachfolger Winnetous. Die Deutschen liebten diesen Obama so, wie sie – vielleicht unbewusst – immer Winnetou, den Edlen Wilden, der eigentlich ein Deutscher ist, geliebt hatten. Sie liebten ihn nicht zuletzt deshalb über alle politischen Lager hinweg – von grün über rot bis schwarz. Sie liebten ihn aber auch, weil er den in ihnen wohnenden Rassismus so perfekt in eine positive Bahn lenken konnte, in der aus der unterschwelligen Angst vor dem Fremden, etwas Positives, die andere Rasse überhöhendes, werden konnte.

Obama als der Edle Wilde, als der Winnetou der Herzen, wurde automatisch auch zu einem von uns. Denn wenn der Edle Wilde Winnetou als Deutscher stirbt, weil er eigentlich schon immer einer gewesen ist – dann musste auch Obama in seinem Charakter ein Deutscher und kein Yankee sein. Mit seinem spektakulären Auftritt an der Berliner Siegessäule hatte er diese Botschaft unbewusst aber erfolgreich in die Herzen der Deutschen gelegt.

Die Deutschen stellten sich damit selbst die Falle auf, in der sie sich spätestens 2013 unrettbar verfangen sollten. Denn sie hatten verkannt, dass dieser Heilsbringer, dieser Edle Wilde aus dem Norden Amerikas, in erster Linie nichts anderes war als ein US-amerikanischer Politiker wie tausende vor ihm. Und eben ein US-amerikanischer Präsident wie dreiundvierzig vor ihm. Auch ein Obama kochte nur mit Wasser. Auch ein Obama unterlag den Zwängen des tagtäglichen Politikgeschehens. Auch ein Obama stand unter dem Druck, den die Plutokraten der USA ausüben konnten.

Denkt man in historischen Kategorien, dann war es Obamas größter Fehler, nicht in dem ersten Jahr seiner Amtszeit von einem fanatischen weißen Amerikaner ermordet worden zu sein. Wäre ihm dieses zugestoßen – nicht nur die Deutschen, aber diese ganz besonders, hätten den Mulatten Obama zu einer gottesähnlichen Heilsfigur stilisiert, gegen die die Ikone Kennedy derart in den Hintergrund hätte treten müssen, dass man sie ob ihrer Blässe bald nicht mehr wahrgenommen hätte. Dieser Obama hätte das Format gehabt, zu einem neuen Messias zu werden.

Es sei dem Menschen Obama und seiner Familie selbstverständlich gegönnt, nicht Opfer eines geisteskranken Fanatikers geworden zu sein. Sein idealisiertes Bild des Edlen Wilden, des farbigen Messias, der angetreten war, die Welt vor sich selbst zu retten, ging darüber jedoch in die Brüche.

Spätestens, als die NSA-Veröffentlichungen des Edward Snowden auch dem letzten Deutschen klar machten, dass die deutsche Freundschaft zu Amerika eine sehr einseitige, der deutschen Gemütlichkeit geschuldete Angelegenheit gewesen war, zerbrach das edle Bild des Winnetou Obama in Tausende von Scherben.

Es war mehr als nur Enttäuschung, die die Reaktionen auf die Erkenntnis erklären hilft, dass der Edle Wilde Winnetou niemals mehr war als das im Kopf eines Spätromantikers herumspukende Idealbild des besseren Deutschen – und auch nie mehr sein konnte. Diese Erkenntnis traf die Deutschen wie ein Schlag mit dem Tomahawk.

Die wahre Welt, so wurde den romantischen Deutschen schlagartig bewusst, kann sich Winnetous nicht leisten.

Und so ist Winnetou nun wieder das Idealbild eines Edlen Wilden, der eigentlich ein Deutscher ist, und der doch niemals Wirklichkeit werden kann. Und Obama ist ein US-amerikanischer Präsident, der ebenso wenig ein Messias ist, wie dieses seine zahlreichen Vorgänger waren und seine Nachfolger sein werden.

Die in HIRAM7 REVIEW veröffentlichten Essays und Kommentare geben nicht grundsätzlich den Standpunkt der Redaktion wieder.


Stanley Fischer To Become Next Federal Reserve Vice Chairman

December 12, 2013

Stanley Fischer, the former Bank of Israel governor and International Monetary Fund (IMF) official, is alleged to be the successor of Janet Yellen as vice chairman of the U.S. Federal Reserve.

STANLEY FISCHER

As a professor of economics at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), he taught Fed Chairman Ben S. Bernanke, whose term ends in January 2014, and European Central Bank chief Mario Draghi.

Washington Post columnist Neil Irwin, and author of The Alchemists: Three Central Bankers and a World on Fire, explains why Stanley Fischer is the most qualified candidate for the job.

“A crisis-management veteran. Fischer has faced trial by fire, most dramatically as the deputy managing director at the IMF from 1994 to 2001. He was on the front lines dealing with of a series of emerging market crises, including in Mexico, East Asia and Russia.

In other words, if there were to be a crisis in one or more of the emerging powers like China, India or Brazil, it would be the sort of thing that Fischer has spent his career preparing for. That is doubly important right now, as money has been gushing out of emerging economies in the past few months, driving their currencies down and their borrowing costs up.”

Read full story.


Nelson Mandela (1918-2013) or The Making Of A Myth

December 6, 2013

Politicians and people around the globe pay tribute to Nelson Mandela, who died on December 5, 2013. Nelson Mandela guided South Africa from apartheid to multiracial democracy after spending almost three decades in prison.

President Bill Clinton with Nelson Mandela at the Independence Hall in Philadelphia, PA, July 4, 1993. Photo: Executive Office of the President of the United States

President Bill Clinton with Nelson Mandela at the Independence Hall in Philadelphia, PA, July 4, 1993. Photo: Executive Office of the President of the United States

“Now that he’s dead, and can cause no more trouble, Nelson Mandela is being mourned across the ideological spectrum as a saint. But not long ago, in Washington’s highest circles, he was considered an enemy of the United States. Unless we remember why, we won’t truly honor his legacy,” argues foreign policy analyst Peter Beinart in The Daily Beast.

“In the 1980s, Ronald Reagan placed Mandela’s African National Congress on America’s official list of terrorist groups. In 1985, then-Congressman Dick Cheney voted against a resolution urging that he be released from jail. In 2004, after Mandela criticized the Iraq War, an article in National Review said his ‘vicious anti-Americanism and support for Saddam Hussein should come as no surprise, given his longstanding dedication to communism and praise for terrorists.’ As late as 2008, the ANC remained on America’s terrorism watch list, thus requiring the 89-year-old Mandela to receive a special waiver from the secretary of State to visit the U.S.”

Read full story.


President Bill Clinton receives Presidential Medal of Freedom

November 19, 2013

U.S. President Barack Obama awards the Presidential Medal of Freedom to former U.S. President Bill Clinton in the East Room at the White House on November 19, 2013 in Washington, DC.

Bill Clinton


Crime Wars: Gangs, Drugs, and U.S. National Security

March 4, 2011
CNAS Report: U.S. and Mexico Should Embrace Regional Cooperation to Combat Drug Cartels

CNAS Report: U.S. and Mexico Should Embrace Regional Cooperation to Combat Drug Cartels

Press Release

Washington, D.C., March 4, 2011 – As Presidents Obama and Calderón continue to discuss the United States and Mexico’s efforts to combat growing drug-related violence, the leaders should look to embrace regional cooperation to combat the cartels, according to a recent report authored by Center for a New American Security (CNAS) Senior Fellow Bob Killebrew
 
In Crime Wars: Gangs, Drugs, and U.S. National Security, Killebrew surveys organized crime throughout the Western Hemisphere and analyzes the challenges it poses to individual countries and regional security. He argues that Mexico will remain a key state in the struggle against violent organized crime in the region, and that the United States should continue to support Mexico’s efforts while examining its own role in the ongoing conflict. In addition, the report notes, the United States and Mexico should:  

  • Increase U.S.-Mexico law enforcement and intelligence cooperation.
  • Increase bilateral training and assistance.
  • Embrace regional cooperation to attack cartels.
  • Attack the cartels’ financial networks and money-laundering capabilities.
“Whether Calderón and his successors can or will sustain a long-term, bloody fight to root out corruption in the Mexican state and reassert the rule of law is a matter of grave concern for the United States,” said Killebrew. Read full story.
 
Press Contact:
Shannon O’Reilly
Director of External Relations
Email: soreilly@cnas.org
Ph: (202) 457-9408