Aftermaths of the Ukraine Coup d’État: The new cold war between Russia and the U.S.

February 23, 2014

An Op-Ed by Narcisse Caméléon, deputy editor-in-chief

“The main foundations of every state, new states as well as ancient or composite ones, are good laws and good arms. You cannot have good laws without good arms, and where there are good arms, good laws inevitably follow.” Niccolò Machiavelli

NATO EXPANSION

Putin will probably address the U.S. missile shield, saying Russia would have to respond militarily if the United States continues to deploy elements of the shield to Eastern European countries (especially Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania, and now Ukraine).

In the past, Russia also accused NATO of building up naval forces in the Black Sea, though the United States cancelled plans to send a ship to the region.

The Black Sea is critical to Russian defense – the NATO does not have the ability to project power through land forces against Russia but has naval capacity to potentially limit Russian operations in the area. The best way to deal with Russia isn’t to attempt to isolate it, but to cooperate with it.

Anyway: the European people will likely pay the biggest price for the Coup d’État in Ukraine, as this conflict could lead to a civil war and to further instability in the continent.

Never touch a running system.

Let’s see what happens next.

Advertisements

China loses its allure

January 27, 2014

This week’s print edition of The Economist brings a worth reading story on China: life is getting harder for foreign companies there.

“According to the late Roberto Goizueta, a former boss of The Coca-Cola Company, April 15th 1981 was “one of the most important days…in the history of the world.” That date marked the opening of the first Coke bottling plant to be built in China since the Communist revolution.

The claim was over the top, but not absurd. Mao Zedong’s disastrous policies had left the economy in tatters. The height of popular aspiration was the “four things that go round”: bicycles, sewing machines, fans and watches. The welcome that Deng Xiaoping, China’s then leader, gave to foreign firms was part of a series of changes that turned China into one of the biggest and fastest-growing markets in the world.

For the past three decades, multinationals have poured in. After the financial crisis, many companies looked to China for salvation. Now it looks as though the gold rush may be over.”

Read full story.


Trade Deals Take Global Commerce Back to the Future

January 17, 2014

Edward Alden argues in an article for World Politics Review that the United States and European Union are reasserting their control over global trade rules after two decades of stalemate with developing countries.

After the negotiations that led to the creation of the WTO in 1995, developing country officials were determined to never again allow the U.S. and EU dictate the final terms of a global trade agreement. For the past two decades, until this month’s modest agreement in Bali, they have made good on that threat. But through ambitious regional deals, the U.S. and EU are reasserting control over global trade rules.

“Never again. That was the sentiment I remember hearing over and over from developing country officials following the tumultuous completion of the Uruguay Round negotiations in 1993 that led to the creation of the World Trade Organization (WTO) two years later. Once again, most of them believed, the United States and the European Union had dictated the final terms of a global trade agreement and forced it down the throats of the rest of the world. These countries were determined to have far more say in the shape of any future deals.

For the past two decades, until this month’s modest agreement in Bali to adopt new “trade facilitation” measures, the developing countries have made good on that threat. They have insisted that any new global trade agreement, such as that pursued unsuccessfully over the past decade through the Doha Round, pay special attention to their needs and priorities in areas like agriculture, manufacturing and intellectual property rules. Their united opposition has made it impossible to conclude another big global trade round on terms acceptable to the U.S. and EU.”

Read full story.


The Meaning of Israel: A Personal View

January 15, 2014

In light of the obsessive, hypocritical focus by several scholarly groups taking aim at Israel, not to mention the permanent chorus of Israel’s detractors both here and abroad, David Harris wants to offer a totally different view of the Jewish state. This is a time to stand up and speak out.

An op-ed by David Harris
Executive Director of the American Jewish Committee
The Jerusalem Post, January 15, 2014

Against the backdrop of recent efforts in some academic circles to vilify and isolate Israel, let me put my cards on the table right up front. I’m not dispassionate when it comes to Israel. Quite the contrary.

The establishment of the state in 1948; the fulfillment of its envisioned role as home and haven for Jews from around the world; its wholehearted embrace of democracy and the rule of law; and its impressive scientific, cultural, and economic achievements are accomplishments beyond my wildest imagination.

For centuries, Jews around the world prayed for a return to Zion. We are the lucky ones who have seen those prayers answered. I am grateful to witness this most extraordinary period in Jewish history and Jewish sovereignty.

And when one adds the key element, namely, that all this took place not in the Middle West but in the Middle East, where Israel’s neighbors determined from day one to destroy it through any means available to them—from full-scale wars to wars of attrition; from diplomatic isolation to international delegitimation; from primary to secondary to even tertiary economic boycotts; from terrorism to the spread of anti-Semitism, often thinly veiled as anti-Zionism—the story of Israel’s first 65 years becomes all the more remarkable.

No other country has faced such a constant challenge to its very right to exist, even though the age-old biblical, spiritual, and physical connection between the Jewish people and the Land of Israel is unique in the annals of history.

Indeed,  that connection is of a totally different character from the basis on which, say, the United States, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, or the bulk of Latin American countries were established, that is, by Europeans with no legitimate claim to those lands who decimated indigenous populations and proclaimed their own authority. Or, for that matter, North African countries that were conquered and occupied by Arab-Islamic invaders and totally redefined in their national character.

No other country has faced such overwhelming odds against its very survival, or experienced the same degree of never-ending international demonization by too many nations that throw integrity and morality to the wind, and slavishly follow the will of the energy-rich and more numerous Arab states.

Yet Israelis have never succumbed to a fortress mentality, never abandoned their deep yearning for peace with their neighbors or willingness to take unprecedented risks to achieve that peace, never lost their zest for life, and never flinched from their determination to build a vibrant, democratic state.

This story of nation-building is entirely without precedent.

 Here was a people brought to the brink of utter destruction by the genocidal policies of Nazi Germany and its allies. Here was a people shown to be utterly powerless to influence a largely indifferent world to stop, or even slow down, the Final Solution. And here was a people, numbering barely 600,000, living cheek-by-jowl with often hostile Arab neighbors, under unsympathetic British occupation, on a harsh soil with no significant natural resources other than human capital in then Mandatory Palestine.

That the blue-and-white flag of an independent Israel could be planted on this land, to which the Jewish people had been intimately linked since the time of Abraham, just three years after the Second World War’s end—and with the support of a decisive majority of UN members at the time—truly boggles the mind.

And what’s more, that this tiny community of Jews, including survivors of the Holocaust who had somehow made their way to Mandatory Palestine despite the British blockade, could successfully defend themselves against the onslaught of five Arab standing armies that launched their attack on Israel’s first day of existence, is almost beyond imagination.

To understand the essence of Israel’s meaning, it is enough to ask how the history of the Jewish people might have been different had there been a Jewish state in 1933, in 1938, or even in 1941. If Israel had controlled its borders and the right of entry instead of Britain, if Israel had had embassies and consulates throughout Europe, how many more Jews might have escaped and found sanctuary?

Instead, Jews had to rely on the goodwill of embassies and consulates of other countries and, with woefully few exceptions, they found there neither the “good” nor the “will” to assist.

I witnessed firsthand what Israeli embassies and consulates meant to Jews drawn by the pull of Zion or the push of hatred. I stood in the courtyard of the Israeli embassy in Moscow and saw thousands of Jews seeking a quick exit from a Soviet Union in the throes of cataclysmic change, fearful that the change might be in the direction of renewed chauvinism and anti-Semitism.

Awestruck, I watched up-close as Israel never faltered, not even for a moment, in transporting Soviet Jews to the Jewish homeland, even as Scud missiles launched from Iraq traumatized the nation in 1991. It says a lot about the conditions they were leaving behind that these Jews continued to board planes for Tel Aviv while missiles were exploding in Israeli population centers. In fact, on two occasions I sat in sealed rooms with Soviet Jewish families who had just arrived in Israel during these missile attacks. Not once did any of them question their decision to establish new lives in the Jewish state. And equally, it says a lot about Israel that, amid all the pressing security concerns, it managed to continue to welcome these new immigrants without missing a beat.

And how can I ever forget the surge of pride—Jewish  pride—that  completely enveloped me in July 1976 on hearing the astonishing news of Israel’s daring rescue of the 106 Jewish hostages held by Arab and German terrorists in Entebbe, Uganda, over 2,000 miles from Israel’s borders? The unmistakable message: Jews in danger will never again be alone, without hope, and totally dependent on others for their safety.

Not least, I can still remember, as if it were yesterday, my very first visit to Israel. It was in 1970, and I was not quite 21 years old.

I didn’t know what to expect, but I recall being quite emotional from the moment I boarded the El Al plane to the very first glimpse of the Israeli coastline from the plane’s window. As I disembarked, I surprised myself by wanting to kiss the ground. In the ensuing weeks, I marveled at everything I saw. To me, it was as if every apartment building, factory, school, orange grove, and Egged bus was nothing less than a miracle. A state, a Jewish state, was unfolding before my very eyes.

After centuries of persecutions, pogroms, exiles, ghettos, pales of settlement, inquisitions, blood libels, forced conversions, discriminatory legislation, and immigration restrictions—and, no less, after centuries of prayers, dreams, and yearning—the Jews had come back home and were  the masters of their own fate.

I was overwhelmed by the mix of people, backgrounds, languages, and lifestyles, and by the intensity of life itself. Everyone, it seemed, had a compelling story to tell. There were Holocaust survivors with harrowing tales of their years in the camps. There were Jews from Arab countries, whose stories of persecution in such countries as Iraq, Libya, and Syria were little known at the time. There were the first Jews arriving from the USSR seeking repatriation in the Jewish homeland. There were the sabras—native-born Israelis—many of whose families had lived in Palestine for generations. There were local Arabs, both Christian and Muslim. There were Druze, whose religious practices are kept secret from the outside world. The list goes on and on.

I was moved beyond words by the sight of Jerusalem and the fervor with which Jews of all backgrounds prayed at the Western Wall. Coming from a nation that was at the time deeply divided and demoralized, I found my Israeli peers to be unabashedly proud of their country, eager to serve in the military, and, in many cases, determined to volunteer for the most elite combat units. They felt personally involved in the enterprise of building a Jewish state, more than 1,800 years after the  Romans defeated the Bar Kochba revolt,  the last Jewish attempt at sovereignty on this very land.

To be sure, nation-building is an infinitely complex process. In Israel’s case,  it began against a backdrop of tensions with a local Arab population that laid claim to the very same land, and tragically refused a UN proposal to divide the land into Arab and Jewish states; as the Arab world sought to isolate, demoralize, and ultimately destroy the state; as Israel’s population doubled in the first three years of the country’s existence, putting an unimaginable strain on severely limited resources; as the nation was forced to devote a vast portion of its limited national budget to defense expenditures; and as the country coped with forging a national identity and social consensus among a population that could not have been more geographically, linguistically, socially, and culturally heterogeneous.

Moreover, there is the tricky and underappreciated issue of the potential clash between the messy realities of statehood and, in this case, the ideals and faith of a people. It is one thing for a people to live their religion as a minority; it is quite another to exercise sovereignty as the majority population while remaining true to one’s ethical standards. Inevitably, tension will arise between a people’s spiritual or moral self-definition and the exigencies of statecraft, between our highest concepts of human nature and the daily realities of individuals in decision-making positions wielding power and balancing a variety of competing interests.

Even so, shall we raise the bar so high as to ensure that Israel—forced to function in the often gritty, morally ambiguous world of international relations and politics, especially as a small, still endangered state—will always fall short?

Yet, the notion that Israel would ever become ethically indistinguishable from any other country, reflexively seeking cover behind the convenient justification of realpolitik to explain its behavior, is equally unacceptable.

Israelis, with only 65 years of statehood under their belts, are among the newer practitioners of statecraft. With all its remarkable success, consider the daunting political, social, and economic challenges in the United States 65 or even 165 years after independence, or, for that matter, the challenges it faces today, including stubborn social inequalities. And let’s not forget that the United States, unlike Israel, is a vast country blessed with abundant natural resources, oceans on two-and-a half sides, a gentle neighbor to the north, and a weaker neighbor to the south.

Like any vibrant democracy, America is a permanent work in progress. The same holds true for Israel. Loving Israel as I do, though, doesn’t mean overlooking its shortcomings, including the excessive and unholy intrusion of religion into politics, the marginalization of non-Orthodox Jewish religious streams, the dangers posed by political and religious zealots, and the unfinished, if undeniably complex, task of integrating Israeli Arabs into the mainstream.

But it also doesn’t mean allowing such issues to overshadow Israel’s remarkable achievements, accomplished, as I’ve said, under the most difficult of circumstances.

In just 65 years, Israel has built a thriving democracy, unique in the region, including a Supreme Court prepared, when it deems appropriate, to overrule the prime minister or the military establishment, a feisty parliament that includes every imaginable viewpoint along the political spectrum, a robust civil society, and a vigorous press.

It has built an economy whose per capita GNP exceeds the combined total of its four contiguous sovereign neighbors—Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, and Syria.

It has built universities and research centers that have contributed to advancing the world’s frontiers of knowledge in countless ways, and won a slew of Nobel Prizes in the process.

It has built one of the world’s most powerful militaries—always under civilian control, I might add—to ensure its survival in a rough-and-tumble neighborhood. It has shown the world how a tiny nation, no larger than New Jersey or Wales, can, by sheer ingenuity, will, courage, and commitment, defend itself against those who would destroy it through conventional armies or armies of suicide bombers. And it has done all this while striving to adhere to a strict code of military conduct that has few rivals in the democratic world, much less elsewhere—in the face of an enemy prepared to send children to the front lines and seek cover in mosques, schools, and hospitals.

It has built a quality of life that ranks it among the world’s healthiest nations and with a particularly high life expectancy, indeed higher than that of the U.S.

It has built a thriving culture, whose musicians, writers, and artists are admired far beyond Israel’s borders. In doing so, it has lovingly taken an ancient language, Hebrew, the language of the prophets, and rendered it modern to accommodate the vocabulary of the contemporary world.

It has built a climate of respect for other faith groups, including Baha’i, Christianity and Islam, and their places of worship. Can any other nation in the area make the same claim?

It has built an agricultural sector that has had much to teach developing nations about turning an arid soil into fields of fruits, vegetables, cotton, and flowers.

Step back from the twists and turns of the daily information overload coming from the Middle East and consider the sweep of the last 65 years. Look at the light-years traveled since the darkness of the Holocaust, and marvel at the miracle of a decimated people returning to a tiny sliver of land—the land of our ancestors, the land of Zion and Jerusalem—and successfully building a modern, vibrant state against all the odds, on that ancient foundation.

In the final analysis, then, the story of Israel is the wondrous realization of a 3,500-year link among a land, a faith, a language, a people, and a vision. It is an unparalleled story of tenacity and determination, of courage and renewal.

And it is ultimately a metaphor for the triumph of enduring hope over the temptation of despair.


Von Winnetou zu Obama – Die Deutschen und der edle Wilde

January 11, 2014

von Tomas Spahn

Der Autor ist ein in Hamburg lebender Publizist und Politikwissenschaftler.

Ein roter Held

Winnetou ist ein Idol meiner Kindheit. Er stand für all das, was wir als Kinder sein wollten. Und vielleicht auch sein sollten.

Winnetou war ein Held. Nicht so einer von diesen Deppen, die laut schreiend in der ersten Reihe der Kriegsmaschinerie auf den Feind losrennen, um dann aufgebahrt und mit Orden versehen zwecks Beerdigung zu den Angehörigen zurück geschickt zu werden. Nein, ein echter Held. Obgleich – ganz zum Schluss … nein. Auch da bleibt Winnetou ein wahrer Held. Nicht einer, der sich mit Hurra für irgendeine imaginäre Idee wie Volk und Vaterland opfert, sondern einer, der mit Bedacht sein eigenes Leben für andere einsetzt, wohl ahnend, dass er es verlieren wird.

Dieser Tod eines wahren Helden aber ist es nicht allein.

Winnetou ist zuverlässig und pünktlich. Er verpasst keine Verabredung, und ist er doch  dazu gezwungen, so lässt er seinen Partner die alternativlosen Gründe wissen und gibt ihm Mitteilung, wann und wo das Treffen nachgeholt werden kann.

Winnetou ist uneingeschränkt ehrlich. Niemals würde er jemanden betrügen. Das ist einfach unter seiner Würde.

Winnetou ist gerecht. Niemals würde er gegen jemanden etwas unternehmen, der nichts gegen ihn unternommen hat.

Winnetou ist edelmütig. Er vergibt seinem Feind, selbst wenn dieser ihm das Leben nehmen wollte.

Winnetou ist altruistisch. Er opfert am Ende alles, was er hat, für andere. Ungerechtfertigt Böses tun – das kann Winnetou  nicht.

Winnetou ist nicht rassistisch. Er hilft jedem, der der Hilfe bedarf, unabhängig von dessen Rasse. Sogar dem Neger, der doch, wie Winnetous Erfinder Karl May nicht müde wird zu erwähnen, aus Sicht der Rasse des Winnetou weit unter diesem steht.

Und damit kommen wir zu dem, was Winnetou nicht ist.

Winnetou ist kein Weißer. Er ist ein Roter. Oder besser: Mitglied der indianischen Rasse, die, wie May betont, gleichsam gottgewollt zum Aussterben verdammt ist. Seine indianische Abstammung macht Winnetou unterscheidbar und es liefert eine Grundlage dafür, Menschen aufgrund ihrer Rasse in Schubladen zu stecken. May topft ihn zur Tarnung um, als Winnetou mit ihm Nordafrika bereist. Aus dem Athapasken, dem Apachen, wird ein Somali. Wohl bemerkt: Ein Somali – kein Neger. Denn offenbar sind Somali für May keine Schwarzen. Zumindest sind sie für ihn keine „Neger“.

Winnetou ist nicht zivilisiert. Er ist das, was man in der zweiten Hälfte des neunzehnten Jahrhunderts – und darüber hinaus – unter einem Wilden verstand. Oder besser: Winnetou war als Wilder geboren worden. Und als Indianer blieb er es bis zu seinem Tode. Nicht aber als Mensch.

Winnetou wohnt nicht in Städten. Obgleich der Pueblo-Bau, den May irrtümlich als seinen Heimatort vorstellt – denn die Apachen waren keine Pueblo-Indianer – eine städtische Struktur bereits erahnen lässt.

Winnetou geht keiner geregelten Arbeit nach. Er ist der Häuptling seines spezifischen Apachenstammes der Mescalero – und er wird von fast allen Stämmen der Apachen als ihr ideelles Oberhaupt anerkannt, was ebenfalls an der Wirklichkeit vorbei geht, da die südlichen Athapasken durchaus einander feindlich gesinnte Gruppen bildeten. Betrachtet man im Sinne Mays die Apachen als eine Nation, so ist Winnetou ein indianischer Kaiser. Entsprechend edel und rein ist sein Charakter – obgleich Karl May damit an der Wirklichkeit europäischer Kaiser meilenweit vorbeiläuft. Aber das steht auf einem anderen Blatt.

Winnetou zieht durch seine Welt, um Gutes zu tun. Da ist er ein wenig wie Jesus. Auch wenn er keine Wunder tut, so ist er doch alles in allem wunder-voll. In einem Satz:

Winnetou ist genau das, als was er in die Literatur eingehen sollte und eingegangen ist: Das Idealbild des Edlen Wilden. Oder?

Zwischen Romantik und Gründerzeit

Werfen wir einen Blick auf Winnetous Schöpfer, den Sachsen Karl May. Nur selten hat Deutschland einen derart phantasiebegabten Schriftsteller wie ihn hervorgebracht. Und jemanden, der so wie er selbst zu einer der Figuren wurde, die er in seinen Romanen beschrieb.

May war ein Kind seiner Zeit. Er war ein Romantiker, dessen kleine Biedermeierwelt über Nacht in das globale Weltgeschehen geschubst worden war. Seine gedankliche Reise in die scheinbare Realität fremder Länder ist dabei eher Schein als Sein. Er verarbeitete die neue Welt in seinen Romanen, immer auf der Suche nach dem Weg aus dem Biedermeier in eine neue Zeit, ohne dabei die Ideale seiner romantischen Introvertiertheit aufgeben zu wollen, aufgeben zu können.

May war obrigkeitsgläubig – und doch war er es nur so lange, wie die Obrigkeit das Richtige tat. Richtig war für May das, was aus seiner Interpretation des Christentums heraus Gottes Willen entsprach. Die Überzeugung, dass ein höheres Wesen die Geschicke der Welt lenke, ist unverrückbar mit May verknüpft. Aus diesem Glauben heraus muss das Gute immer siegen und das Böse immer verlieren, denn wäre es anders, hätte Mays Gott versagt. Das aber kann ein Gott nicht. Doch Mays Gott gibt dem Menschen Spielraum. Mays Gottesglaube ist nicht der an ein unverrückbares Schicksal. Der Mensch hat es selbst in der Hand, seine persönliche Nähe zu dem einen Gott zu gestalten. An dessen endgültigen Sieg über das Böse aber lässt May nie auch nur den Hauch eines Zweifels aufkommen.

Was für die mystische Welt des Glaubens gilt, gilt für May auch für die Politik. May war kaisertreu und undemokratisch. May macht dieses nicht an den Großen der Welt fest. Es ist sein Old Shatterhand oder sein Kara ben Nemsi, der undemokratisch agiert. Demokratie behindert seine Hauptakteure, behindert ihn in der Entscheidungsfindung. In den wenigen Fällen, in denen demokratische Mehrheitsentscheide die Position des Romanhelden überstimmen, endet dieses regelmäßig in einer Katastrophe. Dennoch war May nicht im eigentlichen Sinne totalitär, eher patriarchalisch. Er zwang niemanden, sich seinem Urteil zu unterwerfen, stellte allerdings gleichzeitig fest, dass er mit jenen, die dieses nicht taten, nichts mehr zu tun haben wolle, weil sie das Richtige nicht erkennten. Es ist in gewisser Weise ein alttestamentarischer Ansatz, den May vertritt. Die von der Natur – und damit von Gott – eingesetzte Führungsperson tut allein schon deshalb das Richtige, weil sie auf Gottes Wegen schreitet. Und weil dieses so ist, ist es selbstverständlich, dass alle anderen Vernünftigen dieser Führungsperson folgen. Auf die Unvernünftigen kann man dann gern verzichten.

May war nicht nur ein Großdeutscher – er war ein Gesamtdeutscher. Das war nicht selbstverständlich zu seiner Zeit, als das Zusammenbringen der Deutschen Kleinstaaten unter dem Preußischen König als Kaiser keine zwanzig Jahre zurück lag. Es war noch weniger selbstverständlich für einen Sachsen, dessen lebenslustiges Kleinreich immer wieder Opfer der asketischen Nachbarn im Norden geworden war. Doch May stand hier fest und unverrückbar in der Tradition der pangermanistischen Burschenschaften: „Von der Maaß bis an die Memel, von der Etsch bis an den Belt …”

May war auch Europäer. Trotz des noch nicht lange zurückliegenden Französisch-Preußischen Krieges, aus dem ein Kleindeutsch-Französischer wurde, stehen ihm von allen Europäern die Franzosen am nächsten. Dänen und Holländer gehören dagegen fast schon automatisch zur germanischen Familie. Und die Österreicher sowieso.

Insofern wird man May vielleicht am ehesten gerecht, wenn man ihn als Gemanopäer bezeichnet. Geschichtlich bewandert ging er davon aus, dass zumindest die westeuropäischen Völker sämtlichst germanischen Ursprungs waren, auch wenn bei den Südeuropäern der römische Einfluss unverkennbar blieb. Das einte.

May war kein Rassist. Zumindest nicht in dem Sinne, wie wir diesen Begriff heute verstehen. Und dennoch war er alles andere als frei von Rassevorurteilen. Wenn er das Bild des Negers aus der Sicht des Indianers zeichnet, dann zeichnet er damit auch sein eigenes. Für May ist der Bewohner Afrikas in gewisser Weise eine Art des menschlichen Urtypus. Ungebildet, unzivilisiert. Aber unzweifelhaft ein Mensch – keine Sache, die man zum Sklaven machen darf. Mays Neger kann mit Hilfe des zivilisierten Weißen in die Lage versetzt werden, zumindest Anschluss zu finden. Wenn er auch nie in der Lage sein wird, intellektuell an die Fähigkeiten des Weißen heranzureichen. Deswegen sprechen die Schwarzen, die bei Karl May auftreten, grundsätzlich ein Art Stammeldeutsch. Es hat etwas von Babysprache – und es charakterisiert damit gleichzeitig den May’schen Genotyp des Negers: Ausgestattet mit einen hohen Maß an emotionaler Wärme, aber unselbstständig und der permanenten Anleitung bedürftig. Gleichwohl anerkennt er – fast schon ungläubig – den militärischen Erfolg der südostafrikanischen Zulu.

Das ist bei dem Indianer anders. Als Leser spürt man den Unterschied zwischen roter und schwarzer Rasse ständig. Auch Mays Indianer bedürfen der lenkenden Führung durch den weißen Mann. Auch Mays Indianer sprechen eine Art Stammeldeutsch – aber es ist ein literarisches Stammeldeutsch. Anders als der Schwarze hat der Indianer das Potential, dem Weißen ebenbürtig zu werden. May erkennt, ohne dieses jemals explizit zuzugeben, dass der vorgebliche Wilde Amerikas eigentlich genau dieses nicht ist: Ein Wilder.

May anerkennt eine eigenständige, indianische Kultur, die nur des deutschen Einflusses bedarf, um sich auf die gleiche Stufe mit dem Deutschen zu erheben. Unterschwellig schwingt dabei immer das Bedauern mit, dass Deutschland viel zu spät seine weltrettende Mission entdeckt habe. Wären es Deutsche gewesen und nicht Angelsachsen, die den Norden Amerikas besiedelten – was hätte aus den Wilden werden können. Denn anders als Mays Neger sind seine Indianer eben nicht zivilisationslos.

Vom Romantiker zum Zivilisationskritiker

May selbst wird von Roman zu Roman mehr zum Zivilisationskritiker. Er, dessen Geschichten zwischen 1870 und 1910 entstanden, erkennt den brutalen Gegensatz zwischen den kommerziellen Interessen der angelsächsisch geprägten Yankees und den naturverbundenen, akapitalistischen Indianern, die für ihn immer weniger Wilde sind, sondern eine von unehrenhaften Interessen weißer Raubritter in ihrer Existenz bedrohte, eigene Zivilisation.

Den Wandel, den May in seinem Verhältnis zum Wilden Nordamerikas – und ausschließlich zu diesem – durchlebt, durchlebt auch seine Romanfigur. Zwei Deutsche sind es, die aus dem Naturkind Winnetou einen edlen Wilden formen – der 1848-Altrevolutionär Klekih-Petra und Mays romantisches Ich selbst. Bald schon ist Winnetou nur noch pro forma ein Wilder. Tatsächlich ist sein Verhalten in vielem deutlich zivilisierter als das der mit ihm konkurrierenden Weißen – zumindest soweit diese angelsächsischen Ursprungs sind. Und eigentlich ist Winnetou am Ende nicht einmal mehr ein Vertreter seiner „roten” Rasse. Er stirbt bei dem erfolgreichen Versuch, seine deutschen Freunde zu retten. Im Todeskampf singt ihm ein deutscher Chor ein letztes Lied, geleitet ihn in die Ewigkeit, die er, der einstmals Wilde, nun wie ein guter Deutscher als Christ betritt. „Schar-lih, ich glaube an den Heiland. Winnetou ist ein Christ.“ So lautet der letzte Satz, den der Sterbende spricht. May rettet seinen erdachten Blutsbruder so nicht nur für die Deutschen, er rettet ihn auch für das göttliche Himmelsreich. Winnetou, so diese letzte Botschaft seines Schöpfers, ist einer von uns. Er ist ein Deutscher. Ein guter Deutscher, denn er ist ein Christ. Ein edler Deutscher, denn er ist ein wahrer Christ. Er ist ein solcher Deutscher, wie ein Deutscher in Mays Idealbild eigentlich sein sollte.

Insofern ist jeder, der May dumpfen Rassismus vorwirft, auf dem Holzwege. Mag er in seinem Bild des Afrikaners von der zeitgenössisch vorherrschenden Auffassung des Negers als unterrichtungsbedürftigem Kind geprägt sein, mag seine konfessionell begründete Abneigung gegen Vertreter der Ostkirchen mehr noch als gegen Vertreter des Islam unverkennbar sein und mag er der Vorstellung seiner Zeit folgen, wonach die weiße Rasse von der Natur – und damit von Gott – dazu ausersehen sei, die Welt zu führen – mit der Figur des Winnetou öffnet er dem Wilden den Weg, zu einem Zivilisierten, zu einem Deutschen, zu werden. Vielleicht sogar etwas zu sein, das besser ist als ein Deutscher.

Trotzdem und gerade weil er in seinem inneren Kern nun ein Deutscher ist, bleibt Winnetou, diese wunderbare und idealisierte Schöpfung eines Übermenschen, im Bewusstsein seiner Leser die Inkarnation des edlen Wilden. Und sie verändert den Leser dabei selbst. Denn in dem zivilisierten Kind, dem angepassten Erwachsenen, entfaltet dieser edle Wilde eine eigene Wirkung. Wer in sich Gutes spürt, der wird den Versuch unternehmen, immer auch ein wenig wie Winnetou zu sein. Es ist diese gedachte Mischung aus unangepasster Ursprünglichkeit und geistig-kultureller Überlegenheit, aus instinktivem Gerechtigkeitsgefühl und dem charakterlichen Edelmut der gebildeten Stände, die ihre Faszination entfaltet. Sie machen den eigentlichen Kern des Winnetou aus.

Der wilde Deutsche und der deutsche Wilde

Indem May ab 1890 diese enge Verbundenheit zwischen dem Wilden aus dem Westen der USA nicht mit den Weißen, sondern mit den Deutschen herauskristallisiert und im wahrsten Sinne des Wortes romantisiert, stellt er unterschwellig fest: Wir sind uns ähnlicher, als wir glauben. Ohne explizit England-feindlich zu sein, verdammt May so auch die imperialistische Landnahme aus kommerziellen Interessen, verurteilt den englischen Expansionismus, indem er ihn zu einer Grundeigenschaft der europäischen Nordamerikaner macht.

In gewisser Weise wird so auch der Einstieg des den jungen May darstellenden Old Shatterhand zu einer Allegorie. Als Kind der europäischen Zivilisation hat er kein Problem damit, im Auftrag der Landdiebe tätig zu werden, die eine transkontinentale Bahnverbindung durch das Apachenland führen wollen. Das historische Vorbild wird May in der ab 1880 geplanten Southern Pacific Verbindung gefunden haben. Erst Stück für Stück wird dem Romanhelden das Verbrecherische seiner Tat bewusst – in der Konfrontation mit jenen Wilden, deren Land geraubt werden soll und geraubt werden wird und die sich dennoch schon hier als die edleren Menschen erweisen, indem sie ihrem dann weißen Bruder die Genehmigung geben, die Ergebnisse seiner Arbeit, die ausschließlich dem Ziel dienen, sie, die rechtlosen Wilden, zu bedrängen, an die Landdiebe zu verkaufen und damit seinen Vertrag zu erfüllen.

Um wie viel einfacher wäre es gewesen, Scharlih, wie sich May von seinen erdachten Brüdern nennen lässt, das Gold zu geben, das den Ausfall der Entlohnung hätte ersetzen können. Doch auch hier bleibt der Hochstapler May ein guter Deutscher: pacta sunt servanda.

Gleichwohl manifestiert sich hier der Bruch des Schriftstellers zwischen der deutschen Kultur und der angelsächsischen. Wir, die Deutschen, sind keine Imperialisten. Wir, die Deutschen, sind nicht die Räuber. Wir sind vielmehr jene, die den Wilden dabei helfen, so zu werden wie wir bereits sind. Das ist in einer Zeit, die geprägt war vom Bewusstsein der absoluten Überlegenheit der weißen Rasse, fast schon revolutionär. Und es war gleichzeitig reaktionär, weil es dennoch die Unterlegenheit der Kulturen der Wilden als selbstverständlich voraussetzte. Darüber hinaus liefert May eine perfekte Begründung des einsetzenden deutschen Kolonialismus.

Nicht Gewinnstreben ist des Deutschen Ziel in der Welt der Landräuber, sondern Zivilisationsvermittlung. Wir, diese Deutschen, gehen nicht in die Welt, um Land zu stehlen oder Menschen zu unterwerfen – unsere Ziele sind hehr, und wenn wir auf andere Völker treffen, dann ist es unser Ziel, sie auf die gleiche Ebene der Kultur zu heben, über die wir selbst verfügen. In gewisser Weise entspricht dieses dem Weltbild, das Mays Kaiser am 2. Juli 1900 seinem Expeditionsheer mit auf den Weg nach China gibt: „Ihr habt gute Kameradschaft zu halten mit allen Truppen, mit denen ihr dort zusammenkommt. … wer es auch sei, sie fechten alle für die eine Sache, für die Zivilisation.“ Wilhelm II. war bereit, für diese Zivilisation auch den Massenmord zu befehlen. Das unterschied ihn vom gereiften May.

Den Umgang des belgischen Königs Leopold 2 mit „seinem” Kongo muss May – sollte er um ihn gewusst haben – ebenso zutiefst verurteilt haben, wie ihm die Versklavung der „armen Neger” durch die Araber und die Türken ein Gräuel war. Spätestens der Völkermord an den Herero im deutschen Südwestafrika, der eine erschreckende Ähnlichkeit mit dem einzigen Massenmord des Winnetou im zweiten Teil der Winnetou-Trilogie aufweist, widersprach diesem Ideal eklatant. May selbst äußerte sich dazu nicht mehr  – vielleicht auch deshalb, weil er selbst dieser Welt schon zu entrückt war. Seine einzige Geschichte, die im Süden Afrikas spielt, fällt als Ich-Erzählung des 1842 in Radebeul geborenen Schriftstellers in die späten 1830er Jahre. Seinen letzten Roman hatte May 1910 veröffentlicht – seit 1900 waren seine Erzählungen nicht mehr wirklich von dieser Welt.

Doch das Bild des Edlen Wilden sollte sich dank May unverrückbar im kollektiven deutschen Unterbewusstsein verankern. Es war seitdem immer fest mit dem nordamerikanischen „Wilden“ verknüpft und bot einer Verklärung Vorschub, die manchmal fast schon pseudoreligiösen Charakter annahm. Winnetou blieb unserem Bewusstsein erhalten. Sollte er jemals in die Gefahr geraten sein, vergessen zu werden, so holten ihn die zahllosen B-Movies, die mit einer Titelfigur seines Namens in Annäherung an manchen Inhalt des Karl May in den sechziger Jahren des zwanzigsten Jahrhunderts produziert wurden, zurück in seine rund achtzig Jahre zuvor gedachte Rolle. Zwanzig Jahre nach Kriegsende, nach dieser vernichtenden Niederlage der Deutschen gegen das Angelsächsische, gab dieser Winnetou den moralisch zerstörten Deutschen erneut das Bild einer moralischen Instanz – und auch hier wieder ist der Edle Wilde am Ende mehr der edle Deutsche als der Amerikaner. Was Karl May nicht einmal erahnen konnte – nach der Fast-Vernichtung des Deutschen wurde sein Romanheld derjenige, der unverfänglich weil eben in seiner Herkunft nicht Deutsch die deutschen Tugenden aufgreifen und repräsentieren konnte. Die Tatsache, dass die Filmfigur von einem Franzosen gespielt wurde, unterstrich die Unangreifbarkeit des Deutschen in dieser Figur des Edlen Wilden.

Das Bild vom guten Amerikaner

Winnetou und mit ihm May prägte erneut das Bild einer Generation von dem edlen Uramerikaner, indem er diesen zum eigentlichen Träger deutscher Primärtugenden verklärte. War auch der Yankee in den sechziger Jahren noch derjenige, der, je nach Sichtweise, Deutschland von Hitler befreit oder entscheidend zur Niederlage Deutschlands beigetragen hatte – wobei das eine wie das andere nicht voneinander zu trennen war  – so war der von den Yankees bedrängte Wilde doch das eigentliche Opfer eben dieses Yankee, der immer weniger das Wohl des anderen als vielmehr das eigene im Auge hatte. Unbewusst schlich sich so in die Winnetou-Filme auch eine unterschwellige Kritik am Yankee-Kapitalismus ein, ohne dass man sie deswegen als anti-amerikanisch hätte bezeichnen können. Ob in den Romanen oder in den nachempfundenen Filmen gilt: Die wirklich Bösen, die moralisch Verwerflichen sind niemals Deutsche. Sind es nicht ohnehin schon durch und durch verderbte Kreaturen, deren konkrete Nationalität keine Rolle spielt, so sind es skrupellose Geschäftsleute mit unzweifelhaftem Yankee-Charakter. Vielleicht war dieses auch ein ausschlaggebender Grund, weshalb die DDR-Führung, die mit dem kaisertreuen Sachsen wenig anzufangen wusste, darauf verzichtete, seine Bücher aus den Regalen zu verbannen.

Im Westen Deutschlands verklärte der Blick auf die vor der Tür stehende imperialistische Sowjetarmee das Bild des Amerikaners. War die Deutsch-Sowjetische Freundschaft in den mitteldeutschen Ländern eine staatliche Order, die kaum gelebt wurde, so wurde die deutsch-amerikanische Freundschaft im Westen zu einer gelebten Wirklichkeit. Ähnlich wie schon zu Mays Zeiten zeichnete sich der Deutsche einmal mehr durch ein gerüttelt Maß an Naivität aus. Er verwechselte Interessengemeinschaft zwischen Staaten mit Freundschaft zwischen Völkern.

Uncle Sam, der schon auf seinem Rekrutierungsplakat aus dem Ersten Weltkrieg Menschen fing, um sie für ihr Land in den Tod zu schicken, wurde im Bewusstsein der Nachkriegsdeutschen/West nicht zuletzt dank Marshall-Plan zum altruistischen Onkel Sam aus Amerika.

Das verklärte Bild des US-Amerikaners Winnetou, dieses Edlen Wilden, der so viele erwünschte deutsche Eigenschaften in sich trug, mag dieser Idealisierung Vorschub geleistet haben. Die Tatsache, dass bei der US-amerikanischen Nachkriegspolitik selbstverständlich immer US-Interessen den entscheidenden Ausschlag gaben, wurde von den Deutschen/West gezielt verdrängt. In der ihnen eigenen Gemütlichkeit, für das die angelsächsische Sprache kein Pendant kennt, verklärten sie den früheren Kriegsgegner erst zum Retter und dann zum Freund. Doch die Verklärung sollte Risse bekommen. Und der Entscheidende entstand in jenen sechziger Jahren, die auch die Wiederauferstehung des Winnetou feierten.

Mochte die deutsche Volksseele den US-amerikanischen Kampf in Vietnam anfangs noch als Rettungsaktion vor feindlicher Diktatur gesehen haben – die unmittelbare Position an einer der zu erwartenden Hauptkampflinien zwischen den Systemen vermochte diese Auffassung ebenso zu befördern wie der immer noch im Hinterkopf steckende zivilisatorische Anspruch an Kolonisierung – so wurde, je länger der Krieg dauerte, desto deutlicher, dass es nicht nur hehre Ziele waren, die die USA bewegten, sich in Vietnam zu engagieren. Das Bild vom lieben Onkel Sam aus Amerika bekam Flecken. Mehr und mehr erinnerte das US-amerikanische Vorgehen gegen die unterbewaffneten Dschungelkämpfer der Vietkong und Massaker wie das von MyLai an die Einsätze der US-Kavallerie gegen zahlenmäßig und waffentechnisch unterlegene Stämme der indigenen Amerikaner. Die indianischen Aktionen, die 1973 das Massaker von Wounded Knee in Erinnerung brachten, taten ein weiteres, um die unrühmliche Geschichte der Kolonisierung des Westens der USA in Erinnerung zu rufen.

Sahen sich die deutschen Konservativen fest an der Seite ihrer transatlantischen Freunde im globalen Kampf des Guten gegen das Böse, so verklärte die Linke den Dschungelkämpfer zu edlen Wilden, die sich mit dem Mut der Verzweiflung gegen die Kolonialismuskrake des Weltkapitalismus zur Wehr setzte. Idealbildern, die mit der Wirklichkeit wenig zu tun hatten, folgten beide.

Zu einem tiefen Graben sollte dieser in Vietnam entstandene Riss werden, als mit Bush 2 die Marionette des Yankee-Kapitalismus in einen Krieg ums Öl zog. Hier nun war es wieder, das Bild des ausschließlich auf seinen Profit bedachten Yankee – das Bild des hässlichen Amerikaners, der den Idealen des guten Deutschen so fern stand, dass in den Augen der Deutschen der von ihm bedrängte Wilde allemal der wertvollere Mensch war. In diese Situation, die ein fast schon klassisches Karl-May-Bild zeichnete, platzte 2009 die Wahl des Barack Obama als 44. Präsident der Vereinigten Staaten.

Vom Mulatten zum Messias

Dieser im traditionellen Sinne als Mulatte zu bezeichnende Mann, dessen schwarzafrikanischer Vater aus Kenia und dessen Mutter als klassisch amerikanische Nachkommin von Iren, Engländern und Deutschen aus dem kleinstbürgerlich geprägten Kernland der USA stammte, entfachte bei den Deutschen etwas, das ich als positivistischen Rassismus bezeichnen möchte. Allen voran der Anchorman der wichtigsten öffentlich-rechtlichen Newsshow wurde nicht müde, diesen „ersten farbigen Präsidenten der USA” in den höchsten Tönen zu feiern. Wie sehr er und mit ihm alle, die in das gleiche Horn stießen, ihren tief in ihnen verankerten Rassismus auslebten, wurde ihnen nie bewusst. Denn tatsächlich ist die Reduzierung des Mulatten, der ebenso weiß wie schwarz ist, auf seinen schwarzen Teil nichts anderes als eine gedankliche Fortsetzung nationalsozialistischer Rassegesetze. Der Deutsche, dessen Eltern zur Hälfte arisch und zur anderen Hälfte semitisch – oder eben zur einen Hälfte deutsch und zur anderen Hälfte jüdisch – waren, wurde auf seinen jüdischen Erbteil reduziert. Als vorgeblicher Mischling zweier Menschenrassen  – als „Bastard” – durfte er eines nicht mehr sein: Weißer, Arier, Europäer, Deutscher. Wenn der Nachrichtenmoderator den Mulatten Obama auf seine schwarzafrikanischen Gene reduzierte, mag man dieses vielleicht noch damit zu begründen versuchen, dass die äußere Anmutung des US-Präsidenten eher der eines schwarzen als der eines weißen Amerikaners entspricht. Aber auch dieses offenbart bereits den unterschwelligen Rassismus, der sich bei der deutschen Berichterstattung über Obama Bahn gebrochen hatte.

Ich sprach von einem positivistischen Rassismus – was angesichts der innerdeutschen Rassismusdebatte, die zwangsläufig aus dem Negerkuss einen Schaumkuss und aus dem „schwarzen Mann” des Kinderspiels einen Neger macht, fast schon wie ein Oxymoron wirkt. Doch der Umgang mit dem noch nicht und dem frisch gewählten Obama offenbarte genau diesen positivistischen Rassismus. Indem er den weißen Anteil ausblendete, schob er das möglicherweise Negative im Charakter dieses Mannes ausschließlich auf dessen „weiße“ Gene – und aus dem kollektiven Bewusstsein. Als Schwarzer – denn ein Neger durfte er nicht mehr sein – löste Obama sich von all dem, was die Deutschen an Yankeeismus an ihren transatlantischen „Freunden” kritisierten. Als aus dem schwarzen US-Amerikaner der erste farbige US-Präsident wurde, konnte das immer noch in deutschen Hinterköpfen herumspukende Idealbild des im Norden Amerikas anzutreffenden Edlen Wilden seinen direkten Weg finden zur Verknüpfung des eigentlich schon deutschen Winnetou mit dem nicht-weißen Nordamerikaner Obama. Der Mulatte wurde zur lebenden Inkarnation der May’schen Romanfigur. Den Schritt vom unzivilisierten zum zivilisierten Wilden hatte er bereits hinter sich. Zumindest der nordamerikanische Neger saß nicht mehr als Sklave in einer Hütte an den Baumwollfeldern, um tumb und ungebildet sein Dasein zu fristen. Er war in der weißen Zivilisation angekommen. Aber er war kein Yankee – und er war auch nicht der „Uncle Sam“, der den Deutschen vorschwebte, wenn er an „den Ami“ dachte.

Mit seinem eloquenten Auftreten, mit seiner so unverkennbar anderen Attitüde als der der Yankee-Inkarnation Georg Walker Bush, wurde dieser Barack Obama im Bewusstsein seiner deutschen Fans zu einem würdigen Nachfolger Winnetous. Die Deutschen liebten diesen Obama so, wie sie – vielleicht unbewusst – immer Winnetou, den Edlen Wilden, der eigentlich ein Deutscher ist, geliebt hatten. Sie liebten ihn nicht zuletzt deshalb über alle politischen Lager hinweg – von grün über rot bis schwarz. Sie liebten ihn aber auch, weil er den in ihnen wohnenden Rassismus so perfekt in eine positive Bahn lenken konnte, in der aus der unterschwelligen Angst vor dem Fremden, etwas Positives, die andere Rasse überhöhendes, werden konnte.

Obama als der Edle Wilde, als der Winnetou der Herzen, wurde automatisch auch zu einem von uns. Denn wenn der Edle Wilde Winnetou als Deutscher stirbt, weil er eigentlich schon immer einer gewesen ist – dann musste auch Obama in seinem Charakter ein Deutscher und kein Yankee sein. Mit seinem spektakulären Auftritt an der Berliner Siegessäule hatte er diese Botschaft unbewusst aber erfolgreich in die Herzen der Deutschen gelegt.

Die Deutschen stellten sich damit selbst die Falle auf, in der sie sich spätestens 2013 unrettbar verfangen sollten. Denn sie hatten verkannt, dass dieser Heilsbringer, dieser Edle Wilde aus dem Norden Amerikas, in erster Linie nichts anderes war als ein US-amerikanischer Politiker wie tausende vor ihm. Und eben ein US-amerikanischer Präsident wie dreiundvierzig vor ihm. Auch ein Obama kochte nur mit Wasser. Auch ein Obama unterlag den Zwängen des tagtäglichen Politikgeschehens. Auch ein Obama stand unter dem Druck, den die Plutokraten der USA ausüben konnten.

Denkt man in historischen Kategorien, dann war es Obamas größter Fehler, nicht in dem ersten Jahr seiner Amtszeit von einem fanatischen weißen Amerikaner ermordet worden zu sein. Wäre ihm dieses zugestoßen – nicht nur die Deutschen, aber diese ganz besonders, hätten den Mulatten Obama zu einer gottesähnlichen Heilsfigur stilisiert, gegen die die Ikone Kennedy derart in den Hintergrund hätte treten müssen, dass man sie ob ihrer Blässe bald nicht mehr wahrgenommen hätte. Dieser Obama hätte das Format gehabt, zu einem neuen Messias zu werden.

Es sei dem Menschen Obama und seiner Familie selbstverständlich gegönnt, nicht Opfer eines geisteskranken Fanatikers geworden zu sein. Sein idealisiertes Bild des Edlen Wilden, des farbigen Messias, der angetreten war, die Welt vor sich selbst zu retten, ging darüber jedoch in die Brüche.

Spätestens, als die NSA-Veröffentlichungen des Edward Snowden auch dem letzten Deutschen klar machten, dass die deutsche Freundschaft zu Amerika eine sehr einseitige, der deutschen Gemütlichkeit geschuldete Angelegenheit gewesen war, zerbrach das edle Bild des Winnetou Obama in Tausende von Scherben.

Es war mehr als nur Enttäuschung, die die Reaktionen auf die Erkenntnis erklären hilft, dass der Edle Wilde Winnetou niemals mehr war als das im Kopf eines Spätromantikers herumspukende Idealbild des besseren Deutschen – und auch nie mehr sein konnte. Diese Erkenntnis traf die Deutschen wie ein Schlag mit dem Tomahawk.

Die wahre Welt, so wurde den romantischen Deutschen schlagartig bewusst, kann sich Winnetous nicht leisten.

Und so ist Winnetou nun wieder das Idealbild eines Edlen Wilden, der eigentlich ein Deutscher ist, und der doch niemals Wirklichkeit werden kann. Und Obama ist ein US-amerikanischer Präsident, der ebenso wenig ein Messias ist, wie dieses seine zahlreichen Vorgänger waren und seine Nachfolger sein werden.

Die in HIRAM7 REVIEW veröffentlichten Essays und Kommentare geben nicht grundsätzlich den Standpunkt der Redaktion wieder.


100th Anniversary of Current History

January 1, 2014

Current History, the journal of contemporary international affairs, marks its 100th anniversary with a special January issue: “Global Trends, 2014.” The issue features essays by Michael Mandelbaum, Larry Diamond, Sheila Jasanoff, G. John Ikenberry, Joseph S. Nye Jr., Scott D. Sagan, Bruce Russett, Martha Crenshaw, and more.

Perils and Progress

by Alan Sorensen
Editor of Current History

After Current History began publication a hundred years ago, the world suffered a succession of horrors: world wars, depression, totalitarian tyranny, genocide, nuclear terror, environmental threats. These sorely tested the modern belief in progress. Yet over this same century, knowledge and innovations accumulated, liberal values and open markets spread, and nations laid the foundations for collective security and global governance.

For our centennial issue, we asked a dozen scholars to consider major trends that emerged in the past century and how these might influence events moving forward. A fair reading of their essays gives cause to hope for a bright, if complicated, future.

Not that progress will be automatic. All the essays, on the contrary, emphasize the importance of politics.

The world still depends on America to safeguard security and promote globalization, according to Michael Mandelbaum. Sheila Jasanoff warns that global warming could threaten the human species with ruin, absent concerted effort. The challenges posed by globalization, says G. John Ikenberry, increase the demand for international coordination. Will supply follow? Amrita Narlikar argues that burden sharing will require greater understanding of rising powers’ interests, world views, and negotiating strategies. Still, as Ikenberry suggests, China and other emerging powers have little interest in overturning the US-built international order that has facilitated their progress.

A recent wave of democratic regressions, governing failures in advanced nations, autocratic resistance, and turmoil following the Arab Spring raise concerns about the health of democracy within nations, concedes Larry Diamond.

However, as he points out in his essay, “it is worth considering the intrinsic political dilemmas of authoritarian regimes, and the tenacity of popular aspirations for government that is open and accountable.”

The swelling ranks of a global middle class ought to boost democratic prospects. Nicholas Eberstadt notes that “the greatest population explosion in history” over the past hundred years did not prevent the “greatest jump in per capita income levels ever recorded.” The rapid expansion of global markets has lifted millions from poverty. And the international economy, observes Uri Dadush, is no zero-sum game in which countries prosper only at others’ expense.

In another demonstration that politics matters, the rich nations’ current stagnation has resulted, Dadush says, not from “the rise of the rest,” but from “errors in macroeconomic policy and regulation.”

The security realm, too, is a positive-sum game in which mutual interests multiply. Increasing economic interdependence and advances in liberal norms and institutions account for a demonstrable decline in warfare, writes Bruce Russett.

The ongoing information revolution, according to Joseph S. Nye Jr., is helping to disperse power to more actors, including groups that seek to influence others via example and persuasion, rather than coercion. Martha Crenshaw observes that threats nowadays arise less from rivalry among great powers than from extremist groups operating in frail states. But keeping the nuclear peace, Scott D. Sagan warns, will depend on sustained cooperation to discourage proliferation and uphold the taboo against using atomic arms.

Moral progress, meanwhile, continues apace— evidenced, for example, in evolving attitudes about torture, the treatment of women and minorities, and human rights generally. The struggle for gay rights, highlighted by Omar Encarnación, also underscores the importance of politics. Human rights, too, are not a zero-sum contest (gay rights do not threaten heterosexual rights). And here again, there is cause for optimism.

As Encarnación notes: “International norms, once established, tend to spread to even the most recalcitrant corners of the world as part of the international ‘socialization’ of states.”!

To subscribe, visit currenthistory.com. Or call 1-800-293-3755 in the US, or 856-931-6681 outside the US.


Happy New Year from HIRAM7 REVIEW!

December 31, 2013

Happy New Year from HIRAM7 REVIEW!

The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. HIRAM7 REVIEW was viewed about 55,000 times in 2013. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 20 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Where did they come from?

That’s 149 countries in all!

Most visitors came from The United States, United Kingdom, and Canada. Germany & France were not far behind.

Thanks for flying with HIRAM7 REVIEW in 2013.

We look forward to serving you again in 2014! Happy New Year!

… but wait, there’s more! This is our “Thank You” Song.