The Iran Deal: Consequences and Alternatives

August 14, 2015

In his testimony before the Senate Armed Services Committee, Richard Nathan Haass analyses the nuclear deal with Iran and suggests that any vote by Congress to approve the pact should be linked to legislation or a White House statement that makes clear what the United States would do if there were Iranian non-compliance, what would be intolerable in the way of Iran’s long-term nuclear growth, and what the U.S. was prepared to do to counter Iranian threats to U.S. interests and friends in the Region.

Statement by Richard Nathan Haass

President, Council on Foreign Relations

Before the Committee on Armed Services of the United States Senate on August 4, 2015

1st Session, 114th Congress

Richard Nathan Haass

Mr. Chairman: Thank you for this opportunity to speak about the “Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action” (JCPOA) signed on July 14 by representatives of the five permanent members of the UN Security Council, Germany, and Iran. I want to make it clear that what you are about to hear are my personal views and should not be interpreted as representing the Council on Foreign Relations, which takes no institutional positions.

The agreement with Iran, like any agreement, is a compromise, filled with elements that are attractive from the vantage point of US national security as well as elements that are anything but.

A simple way of summarizing the pact and its consequences is that at its core the accord represents a strategic tradeoff. On one hand, the agreement places significant limits on what Iran is permitted to do in the nuclear realm for the next ten to fifteen years. But these limits, even if respected in full, come at a steep price.

The agreement almost certainly facilitates Iran’s efforts to promote its national security objectives throughout the region (many of which are inconsistent with our own) over that same period. And second, the agreement does not resolve the problems posed by Iran’s actual and potential nuclear capabilities. Many of these problems will become greater as we approach the ten year point (when restrictions on the quantity and quality of centrifuges come to an end) and its fifteen year point (when restrictions pertaining to the quality and quantity of enriched uranium also end).

I was not a participant in the negotiations; nor was I privy to its secrets. My view is that a better agreement could and should have materialized. But this debate is better left to historians. I will as a result address the agreement that exists. I would say at the outset it should be judged on its merits rather than on hopes it might lead (to borrow a term used by George Kennan in another context) to a mellowing of Iran. This is of course possible, but the agreement also could have just the opposite effect. We cannot know whether Iran will be transformed, much less how or how much. So the only things that makes sense to do now is to assess the agreement as a transaction and to predict as carefully as possible what effects it will likely have on Iran’s capabilities as opposed to its intentions.

I want to focus on three areas: on the nuclear dimension as detailed in the agreement; on the regional; and on nuclear issues over the longer term.

There is understandable concern as to whether Iran will comply with the letter and spirit of the agreement. Compliance cannot be assumed given Iran’s history of misleading the IAEA, the lack of sufficient data provided as to Iran’s nuclear past, the time permitted Iran to delay access to inspectors after site-specific concerns are raised, and the difficulty likely to be experienced in reintroducing sanctions. My own prediction is that Iran may be tempted to cut corners and engage in retail but not wholesale non-compliance lest it risk the reintroduction of sanctions and/or military attack. I should add that I come to this prediction in part because I believe that Iran benefits significantly from the accord and will likely see it in its own interest to mostly comply. But this cannot be assumed and may be wrong, meaning the United States, with as many other governments as it can persuade to go along, should both make Iran aware of the penalties for non-compliance and position itself to implement them if need be. I am assuming that the response to sustained non-compliance would be renewed sanctions and that any military action on our part would be reserved to an Iranian attempt at breaking out and fielding one or more nuclear weapons.

The regional dimension is more complex and more certain to be problem. Iran is an imperial power that seeks a major and possibly dominant role in the region. Sanctions relief will give it much greater means to pursue its goals, including helping minority and majority Shi’ite populations in neighboring countries, arming and funding proxies such as Hezbollah and Hamas, propping up the government in Damascus, and adding to sectarianism in Iraq by its unconditional support of the government and Shia militias. The agreement could well extend the Syrian civil war, as Iran will have new resources with which to back the Assad government. I hope that Iran will see that Assad’s continuation in power only fuels a conflict that provides recruiting opportunities for the Islamic State, which Iranian officials rightly see as a threat to themselves and the region. Unfortunately, such a change in thinking and policy is a long shot at best.

The United States needs to develop a policy for the region that can deal with a more capable, aggressive Iran. To be more precise, though, it is unrealistic to envision a single or comprehensive US policy for a part of the world that is and will continue to be afflicted by multiple challenges. As I have written elsewhere, the Middle East is in the early throes of what appears to be a modern day 30 Years War in which politics and religion will fuel conflict within and across boundaries for decades, resulting in a Middle East that looks very different from the one the world has grown familiar with over the past century.

I will put forward approaches for a few of these challenges. In Iraq, I would suggest the United States expand its intelligence, military, economic, and political ties with both the Kurds and Sunni tribes in the West. Over time, this has the potential to result in gradual progress in the struggle against the Islamic State.

Prospects for progress in Syria are poorer. The effort to build a viable opposition to both the government and various groups including but not limited to the Islamic State promises to be slow, difficult, anything but assured of success. A diplomatic push designed to produce a viable successor government to the Assad regime is worth exploring and, if possible, implementing. European governments likely would be supportive; the first test will be to determine Russian receptivity. If this is forthcoming, then a Joint approach to Iran would be called for.

I want to make two points here. First, as important as it would be to see the Assad regime ousted, there must be high confidence in the viability of its successor. Not only would Russia and Iran insist on it, but the United States should as well. Only with a viable successor can there be confidence the situation would not be exploited by the Islamic State and result in the establishment of a caliphate headquartered in Damascus and a massacre of Alawites and Christians. Some sort of a multinational force may well be essential.

Second, such a scenario assumes a diplomatic approach to Iran. This should cause no problems here or elsewhere. Differences with Iran in the nuclear and other realms should not preclude diplomatic explorations and cooperation where it can materialize because interests are aligned. Syria is one such possibility, as is Afghanistan. But such diplomatic overtures should not stop the United States acting, be it to interdict arms shipments from Iran to governments or non-state actors; nor should diplomatic outreach in any way constrain the United States from speaking out in reaction to internal political developments within Iran. New sanctions should also be considered when Iran takes steps outside the nuclear realms but still judged to be detrimental to other US interests.

Close consultations will be required with Saudi Arabia over any number of policies, including Syria. But three subjects in particular should figure in US-Saudi talks. First, the United States needs to work to discourage Saudi Arabia and others developing a nuclear option to hedge against what Iran might do down the road. A Middle East with nuclear materials in the hands of warring, potentially unstable regimes would be a nightmare. This could involve assurances as to what will not be tolerated (say, enrichment above a specified level) when it comes to Iran as well as calibrated security guarantees to Saudi Arabia and others.

Second, the Saudis should be encouraged to reconsider their current ambitious policy in Yemen, which seems destined to be a costly and unsuccessful distraction. The Saudi government would be wiser to concentrate on contending with internal threats to its security. And thirdly, Washington and Riyadh should maintain a close dialogue on energy issues as lower oil prices offer one way of limiting Iran’s capacity to pursue programs and policies detrimental to US and Saudi interests.

The agreement with Iran does not alter the reality that Egypt is pursuing a political trajectory unlikely to result in sustained stability or that Jordan will need help in coping with a massive refugee burden. Reestablishing strategic trust with Israel is a must, as is making sure it as well as other friends in the region have what they need to deal with threats to their security. (It matters not whether the threats come from Iran, the Islamic State, or elsewhere.) The United States should also step up its criticism of Turkey for both attacking the Kurds and for allowing its territory to be used as a pipeline for recruits to reach Syria and join the Islamic State.

The third area of concern linked to the nuclear pact with Iran stems from its medium and long-term capabilities in the nuclear realm. It is necessary but not sufficient that Iran not be permitted to assemble one or more nuclear bombs. It is also necessary that it not be allowed to develop the ability to field a large arsenal of weapons with little or no warning. This calls for consultations with European and regional governments to begin sooner rather than later on a follow-on agreement to the current JCPOA. The use of sanctions, covert action, and military force should also be addressed in this context.

I am aware that members of Congress have the responsibility to vote on the Iran agreement. As I have said, it is a flawed agreement. But the issue before the Congress is not whether the agreement is good or bad but whether from this point on the United States is better or worse off with it. It needs to be recognized that passage of a resolution of disapproval (presumably overriding a presidential veto) entails several Major drawbacks.

First, it would allow Iran to resume nuclear activity in an unconstrained manner, increasing the odds the United States would be faced with a decision – possibly as soon as this year or next – as to whether to tolerate the emergence of a threshold or actual nuclear weapons state or use military force against it.

Second, by acting unilaterally at this point, the United States would make itself rather than Iran the issue. In this vein, imposing unilateral sanctions would hurt Iran but not enough to make it alter the basics of ist nuclear program. Third, voting the agreement down and calling for a reopening of negotiations with the aim of producing a better agreement is not a real option as there would insufficient international support for so doing. Here, again, the United States would likely isolate itself, not Iran. And fourth, voting down the agreement would reinforce questions and doubts around the world as to American political divisions and dysfunction. Reliability and predictability are essential attributes for a great power that must at one and the same time both reassure and deter.

The alternative to voting against the agreement is obviously to vote for it. The problem with a simple vote that defeats a resolution of disapproval and that expresses unconditional support of the JCPOA is that it does not address the serious problems the agreement either exacerbated or failed to resolve.

So let me suggest a third path. What I would encourage members to explore is whether a vote for the pact (against a resolution of disapproval) could be associated or linked with policies designed to address and compensate for the weaknesses and likely adverse consequences of the agreement. I can imagine such assurances in the form of legislation voted on by the Congress and signed by the president or a communication from the president to the Congress, possibly followed up by a joint resolution. Whatever the form, it would have to deal with either what the United States would not tolerate or what the United States would do in the face of Iranian non-compliance with the recent agreement, Iran’s long-term nuclear growth, and Iranian regional activities.

Mr. Chairman, thank you again for asking me to meet with you and your colleagues here today. I of course look forward to any questions or comments you may have.


Desert Storm, the Last Classic War

August 7, 2015

Last Sunday marked the twenty-fifth anniversary of the start of the Gulf War. Fought swiftly and successfully, today it looks like something of an anomaly, but its lessons remain valuable.

An Op-Ed by Richard Nathan Haass

Former Director of Policy Planning for the United States Department of State and advisor to Secretary of State Colin Powell

Richard Nathan Haass

Richard Nathan Haass

It was mid-July 1990, and for several days the U.S. intelligence community had been watching Saddam Hussein mass his forces along Iraq’s border with Kuwait. Most of us in the administration of President George H.W. Bush—I was then the top Middle East specialist on the National Security Council—believed that this was little more than a late-20th-century version of gunboat diplomacy. We figured that Saddam was bluffing to pressure his wealthy but weak neighbor to the south into reducing its oil output.

Iraq was desperate for higher oil prices, given the enormous cost of the just-concluded decadelong war with Ayatollah Khomeini’s Iran and Saddam’s own ambitions for regional primacy. Saddam’s fellow Arab leaders, for their part, were advising the Bush administration to stay calm and let things play out to the peaceful outcome they expected. In late July, Saddam met for the first time with April Glaspie, the U.S. ambassador to Iraq, and her cable back to Washington reinforced the view that this was all an elaborate bit of geopolitical theater.

But by Aug. 1—25 years ago this week—it had become apparent that Saddam was amassing far more military forces than he would need simply to intimidate Kuwait. The White House hastily assembled senior staff from the intelligence community and the Departments of State and Defense. After hours of inconclusive talk, we agreed that the best chance for avoiding some sort of Iraqi military action would be for President Bush to call Saddam. I was asked to pitch this idea to my boss, National Security Adviser Brent Scowcroft, and the president.

I rushed over to Gen. Scowcroft’s small West Wing office and brought him up to speed on the deliberations. The two of us then walked over to the East Wing, the living quarters of the White House (as opposed to the working part). President Bush was in the sick bay, getting a sore shoulder tended to after hitting a bucket of golf balls. I briefed him on the latest intelligence and diplomacy, as well the recommendation that he reach out to Saddam.

We were all skeptical that it would work but figured that it couldn’t hurt to try. The conversation shifted to how best to reach the Iraqi leader—a more complicated task than one might think since it was 2 a.m. on Aug. 2 in Baghdad.

We were going through the options when the phone rang. It wasRobert Kimmitt, the acting secretary of state, saying that his department had just received word from the U.S. ambassador in Kuwait that an Iraqi invasion was under way. “So much for calling Saddam,” said the president grimly.

We didn’t know it at the time, but the first major crisis of the post-Cold War world had begun. Looking back on that conflict, which stretched out over the better part of the following year, it now has a classic feel to it—very much at odds with the decidedly nonclassic era unfolding in today’s Middle East. But the Gulf War is still worth remembering, not only because its outcome got the post-Cold War era off to a good start but also because it drove home a number of lessons that remain as relevant as ever.

Saddam’s invasion of Kuwait had taken us by surprise, and it took a few days for the administration to find its bearings. The first National Security Council meeting chaired by the president on Aug. 2—the day of the invasion—was disheartening since the cabinet-level officials couldn’t reach a consensus on what to do. To make matters worse, the president said publicly that military intervention wasn’t being considered. He meant it only in the most literal sense—i.e., that it was premature to start going down that path—but the press interpreted him to mean that he had taken a military response off the table. He hadn’t.

As the meeting ended, I went over to Gen. Scowcroft, who looked at least as worried and unhappy as I did. We quickly agreed that the meeting had been a debacle. He and the president were about to board Air Force One for Aspen, where the president was to give a long-scheduled speech on nuclear weapons and meet with British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher.

Gen. Scowcroft asked me to produce a memo for himself and the president outlining the stakes and the potential courses of action, including a U.S.-led military response. I returned to my office and typed away. “I am [as] aware as you are of just how costly and risky such a conflict would prove to be,” I wrote. “But so too would be accepting this new status quo. We would be setting a terrible precedent—one that would only accelerate violent centrifugal tendencies—in this emerging post-Cold War era.”

A second NSC meeting was held when the president returned the next day. It was as focused and good as the first one had been inchoate and bad. The president wanted to lead off the session to make clear that the U.S. response to this crisis would not be business as usual, but Gen. Scowcroft, Deputy Secretary of State Lawrence Eagleburger (filling in for James Baker, who happened to be in Siberia with Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard Shevardnadze) and Secretary of Defense Dick Cheney all argued that once the commander in chief spoke, it would be impossible to have an open and honest exchange.

The president reluctantly agreed to hold back. Instead, those three top advisers opened the meeting by making the strategic and economic case that Saddam couldn’t be allowed to get away with the conquest of Kuwait. Nobody dissented. A policy was coming into focus.

The next day (Saturday, Aug. 4), much the same group (now including Secretary Baker) met at Camp David for the first detailed discussion of military options. Gen. Colin Powell, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, led off, after which Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf (who oversaw U.S. Central Command) gave a detailed assessment of Iraq’s military strengths and weaknesses, along with some initial thoughts about what the U.S. could do quickly. What emerged was a consensus around introducing U.S. forces into Saudi Arabia to prevent a bad situation from getting far worse—and to deter Saddam from attacking another oil-rich neighbor. A delegation headed by Mr. Cheney and Deputy National Security Adviser Robert Gates would go to Saudi Arabia to make the arrangements.

The U.S. had already put economic sanctions in place and frozen the assets of both Iraq and Kuwait (in the latter case, to ensure that they wouldn’t be looted). The U.N. Security Council—including China and the Soviet Union, with their vetoes—had called for the immediate and unconditional withdrawal of Iraqi forces from all of Kuwait.

After the meeting at Camp David, everyone but the president hustled back to Washington. He didn’t return until the next afternoon. Gen. Scowcroft called to tell me that he couldn’t be there when the president’s helicopter touched down and asked me to meet Marine One and let the president know what was going on. I hurriedly summarized the latest on a single page and borrowed a navy blazer, arriving on the South Lawn just moments before the president.

Once on the ground, President Bush motioned me over and read my update on the military and diplomatic state of play. He scowled as we huddled. Saddam was showing no signs of backing off, and the president had grown tired of assurances from Arab leaders that they could work things out diplomatically if just given the chance. The president was also frustrated with press criticism that the administration wasn’t doing enough. After our brief discussion, he stalked over to the eagerly waiting White House press corps and unloaded with one of the most memorable phrases of his presidency: “This will not stand, this aggression against Kuwait.”

The stage was thus set for the next six months. Diplomacy and economic sanctions failed to dislodge Saddam. In mid-January, Operation Desert Shield—the deployment of some 500,000 U.S. troops, along with their equipment, to the region to protect Saudi Arabia and prepare to oust Iraqi forces from Kuwait—gave way to Operation Desert Storm. The administration not only won U.N. assent for its bold course but also assembled a global coalition, stretching from Australia to Syria, for the military effort. In the end, it took six weeks of air power and four days of land war to free Kuwait and restore the status quo that had prevailed before Saddam’s invasion.

Those days seem distant from what we now face in the Middle East, with virtual anarchy in much of the region and jihadist extremists holding large stretches of territory. But the Gulf War is not just ancient history. Its main lessons are still well worth heeding.

Economic sanctions can only do so much. Even sweeping sanctions supported by much of the world couldn’t persuade Saddam to vacate Kuwait—any more than they have persuaded Russia, Iran or North Korea to reverse major policies of their own in recent years. Moreover, sanctions against Iraq and Cuba demonstrate that sanctions can have the unintended consequence of increasing government domination of an economy.

Assumptions are dangerous things. The administration of George H.W. Bush (myself included) was late in realizing that Saddam would actually invade Kuwait—and too optimistic in predicting that he would be unable to survive his defeat in Kuwait. Just over a decade later, several assumptions made by a second Bush administration proved terribly costly in Iraq. So did later rosy assumptions made by the Obama administration as it pulled out of Iraq, staged a limited intervention in Libya, encouraged the ouster of Egypt’s Hosni Mubarak and called for regime change in Syria.

Multilateralism constrains the U.S., but it can yield big dividends.Broad participation ensures a degree of burden-sharing. Due to contributions from the Gulf states and Japan, the Gulf War ended up costing the U.S. little or nothing financially. Multilateralism—in this case, the support of the U.N. Security Council—can also generate political support within the U.S. and around the world; it supplies a source of legitimacy often judged missing when the U.S. acts alone.

Even successful policies can have unforeseen negative consequences. Our one-sided military victory in the Gulf War may have persuaded others to avoid conventional battlefield confrontations with the U.S. Instead, urban terrorism has become the approach of choice for many in the Middle East, while other enemies (such as North Korea) have opted for nuclear deterrence to ensure that they stay in power.

Limited goals are often wise. They may not transform a situation, but they have the advantage of being desirable, doable and affordable. Ambitious goals may promise more, but delivering on them can prove impossible. The U.S. got into trouble in Korea in 1950 when it was not content with liberating the south and marched north of the 38th parallel in an expensive and unsuccessful attempt to reunify the peninsula by force.

In the Gulf War, President Bush was often criticized for limiting U.S. objectives to what the U.N. Security Council and Congress had signed up for: kicking Saddam out of Kuwait. Many argued that we should have “gone on to Baghdad.” But as the U.S. learned the hard way a decade later in Afghanistan and Iraq, getting rid of a bad regime is easy compared with building a better, enduring alternative. In foreign lands, modest goals can be ambitious enough. Local realities almost always trump inside-the-Beltway abstractions.

There is no substitute for U.S. leadership. The world is not self-organizing; no invisible hand creates order in the geopolitical marketplace. The Gulf War demonstrated that it takes the visible hand of the U.S. to galvanize world action.

Similarly, there is no substitute for presidential leadership. The Senate nearly voted against going to war with Iraq 25 years ago—even though the U.S. was implementing U.N. resolutions that the Senate had sought. The country cannot have 535 secretaries of state or defense if it hopes to lead.

Be wary of wars of choice. The 1991 Gulf War—unlike the 2003 Iraq war—was a war of necessity. Vital U.S. interests were at stake, and after multilateral sanctions and intensive diplomacy came up short, only the military option remained. But most future U.S. wars are likely to be wars of choice: The interests at stake will tend to be important but not vital, or policy makers will have options besides military force. Such decisions about the discretionary use of force tend to be far harder to make—and far harder to defend if, as is often the case, the war and its aftermath turn out to be more costly and less successful than its architects predict.

The historical impact of the Gulf War turned out to be smaller than many imagined at the time—including President Bush, who hoped that the war would usher in a new age of global cooperation after the collapse of the Soviet empire. The U.S. enjoyed a degree of pre-eminence that couldn’t last. China’s rise, post-Soviet Russia’s alienation, technological innovation, American political dysfunction, two draining wars in the wake of 9/11—all contributed to the emergence of a world in which power is more widely distributed and decision-making more decentralized.

The Gulf War looks today like something of an anomaly: short and sharp, with a clear start and finish; focused on resisting external aggression, not nation-building; and fought on battlefields with combined arms, not in cities by special forces and irregulars. Most unusual of all in light of what would follow, the war was multilateral, inexpensive and successful. Even the principle for which the Gulf War was fought—the inadmissibility of acquiring territory by military means—has been drawn into question recently by the international community’s passivity in the face of Russia’s aggression in Ukraine.

It is a stretch to tie the events of 1990-91 to the mayhem that is the Middle East today. The pathologies of the region—along with the 2003 Iraq war and the mishandling of its aftermath, the subsequent pullout of U.S. troops from Iraq, the 2011 Libya intervention and the continuing U.S. failure to act in Syria—all do more to explain the mess.

The Gulf War was a signal success of American foreign policy. It avoided what clearly would have been a terrible outcome—letting Saddam get away with a blatant act of territorial acquisition and perhaps come to dominate much of the Middle East. But it was a short-lived triumph, and it could neither usher in a “new world order,” as President Bush hoped, nor save the Middle East from itself.

This article appears in full in The Wall Street Journal by permission of its original publisher.


Putin – Mensch und Macht

March 23, 2014

von Tomas Spahn

Der Autor ist ein in Hamburg lebender Publizist und Politikwissenschaftler.

Psychogramm eines Straßenjungen

Als ich in den frühen Neunzigern erstmals einen humanitären Hilfskonvoi von Hamburg nach Sankt Petersburg begleitete, gab es für mich einiges zu lernen. Zu lernen darüber, wie Russen ticken – und wie man mit ihnen auskommen kann. Neben zahlreichen anderen Episoden ist mir das folgende Geschehen gut in Erinnerung geblieben.

Herzlichen Dank an Heiko Sakurai für die Bereitstellung der Karikatur.

Eine Episode aus Sankt Petersburg

Als wir nach langer Fahrt durch den nordischen Winter von Helsinki aus in Sankt Petersburg angekommen waren, gehörte es zu den ersten Aufgaben unseres Konvoiführers, sich nach dem Chef der örtlichen Stadtteilgang zu erkundigen. Denn Sankt Petersburg, so erfuhr ich, war aufgeteilt in Claims, die jeweils von Straßengangs aus überwiegend jüngeren Männern beherrscht wurden. Meistens endeten die einzelnen Hoheitsgebiete an natürlichen Hindernissen wie den zahlreichen Kanälen. Manche der Gangs beherrschten jedoch auch größere Stadtgebiete.

Diese Gangs zeichnete ein in wenigen Worten zusammengefasster Ehrenkodex aus. Alles, was sich in ihrem Hoheitsgebiet befand, konnte dort seinen alltäglichen Geschäften nachgehen, solange der Alleinvertretungs-anspruch der Gang anerkannt und sie für ihre Dienste angemessen bezahlt wurde. Es war ein Geschäft auf Gegenseitigkeit.

In unserem spezifischen Falle war der zu bezahlende Dienst ein recht einfacher: Unser aus drei Lastzügen und einem Kleinlaster bestehender Konvoi sollte im öffentlichen Straßenland geparkt werden können und sich an den nächsten Morgenden samt wertvoller Ladung jeweils noch im dem Zustand befinden, in dem er am Vorabend abgestellt worden war. Sich dazu an die örtliche Polizei zu wenden, wäre ein sinnloses Unterfangen gewesen. Denn diese wusste aufgrund jahrelanger, vertrauensvoller Zusammenarbeit genau, wer allein in dem System des gegenseitigen Gebens und Nehmens für derartige Garantien zuständig war.

Über die Hotelrezeption war die Kontaktaufnahme schnell zu organisieren, und nach einer friedlich-freundlichen Einigung über die Höhe der für die benötigte Sicherheitsleistung aufzubringenden Summe war das Geschäft unter Dach und Fach. Und es war gut getan. Denn nicht nur wurde uns ein Stellplatz angewiesen, der, wie man uns wissen ließ, sakrosankt – und damit auch ohne Aufpasser vor jedwedem Diebstahl sicher sei, auch fanden wir an den nächsten Tagen die Fahrzeuge tatsächlich in unberührtem Zustand, mit unbeschädigter Ladung und unentleerten Tanks wieder.

Anders erging es einem offenbar etwas unerfahrenen Hotelgast, der seinen leeren Sattelschlepper ohne Agreement mit der örtlichen Gang abgestellt hatte. Zwar konnte er sich glücklich schätzen, dass sein Fahrzeug am nächsten Morgen noch im Wesentlichen dort stand, wo er es unbedarft abgestellt hatte. Zur Wiederherstellung der Fahrtüchtigkeit bedurfte es allerdings der Einschaltung eines örtlichen Kfz-Mechanikers, der rein zufällig über all die Bremskabel und Utensilien verfügte, die dem Sattelschlepper über Nacht abhanden gekommen waren. Natürlich ließ sich dieser seine Leistung ebenso angemessen honorieren wie die unvermeidbare Auffüllung des über Nacht entleerten Tanks – schließlich waren entsprechende Zubehörteile westeuropäischen Kraftfahrzeugbaus ebenso wie sauberes, reines Diesel im Russland der frühen Neunziger nicht an jeder Straßenecke aufzutreiben …

Der Straßenjunge aus Leningrad

Ich erzähle das, weil sich daraus einiges lernen lässt über den starken Mann im Kreml. Wladimir Putin ist ein Kind dieser Stadt Sankt Petersburg, die zu seiner Jugend noch Leningrad hieß. Wobei es nicht wirklich auf die Stadt ankommt. Denn diese Strukturen fanden sich landesweit. Auch wäre die Vorstellung falsch, dieses Straßengang-Modell zeitlich auf die Phase nach dem Untergang der Sowjetunion verorten zu wollen. Es funktionierte bereits zuvor – und es funktioniert bis heute.

Putin ist mit diesem System, ist in diesem System aufgewachsen. Er kennt es und hat es sich zu Eigen gemacht – musste es sich zu Eigen machen, um nach oben zu kommen. Er wuchs auf in den kleinen, engen Höfen der armen Leute. Dort lernte er, sich im wahrsten Sinne des Wortes durchzuschlagen.

Heute ist er selbst der Chef einer Straßengang. Der mächtigsten Straßengang. Zumindest in Russland – vorerst.

Putins Straßengang ist das, was zu Sowjetzeiten unter der Bezeichnung KGB organisiert war. Der KGB war maßgeblich daran beteiligt, ihn zum Chef zu machen. Wenn die Chefs von Straßengangs so etwas haben wie eine Familie, dann ist Putins Familie der Geheimdienst.

Als Putin nach Moskau ging, hatte er das in Leningrad erlernte Modell ebenso mitgenommen wie die wichtigsten Freunde aus seiner Leningrader Gang. Denn er konnte und kann sich darauf verlassen, dass diese Freunde aus frühen Tagen niemals etwas gegen den ungekrönten König der Gang unternehmen werden.

Die im Westen eine Zeit lang gehegte Hoffnung, der smarte und so westlich wirkende Medwedjew könnte sich zum ernstzunehmenden Gegner Putins aufschwingen, war insofern tatsächlich niemals etwas anderes als Wunschdenken, das an den Wirklichkeiten Russlands meilenweit vorbei ging.

Denn die Straßengangs, die ein fester Bestandteil russischer Gegenwartskultur sind, funktionieren nach simplen Regeln.

Es kann nur eine(n) geben

Die erste Regel lautet: Wer immer der Boss ist, er hat das absolute Sagen. Wer gegen ihn aufmuckt, hat jeden existentiellen Anspruch verwirkt.

Die zweite Regel lautet: Innerhalb des beanspruchten Territoriums kann es nur eine Gang geben, die alles regelt und die über alles die Kontrolle hat. Gibt es jenseits des beanspruchten Gebietes eine weitere Gang, die sich als unüberwindbar erweist, muss man sich mit dieser arrangieren. Dabei gilt: Jedwede Vereinbarung ist nur so lange als bindend zu betrachten, wie die jeweils andere Seite ihre eigene Stärke aufrecht erhalten kann. Denn gleichzeitig gilt auch: Jede mögliche Schwäche der Konkurrenz, die grundsätzlich immer auch als Gegner wahrgenommen wird, ist auszunutzen, um den eigenen Gebietsanspruch zu erweitern.

Siegen oder untergehen

Daraus folgt die dritte Regel: Wer sich mit der Gang anlegt, ist zum Sieg gezwungen. Erringt er diesen nicht, wird er vernichtet. Im Zweifel auch physisch. Nicht nur Chodorkowski und Beresowski, deren Gangs sich den Leningradern nicht unterwerfen wollten, mussten dieses leidvoll erfahren.

Denkbar ist jedoch, sich aus mehr oder minder freien Stücken als schwächere Straßengang der mächtigeren anzuschließen. Was bedeutet, dass man sich deren Boss vorbehaltlos unterwirft. Und zu keinem Zeitpunkt eigene Ambitionen der Machtübernahme erkennen lässt.

Keine unkalkulierbaren Risiken

Neben diesen drei Grundregeln existiert auch eine ebenso ungeschriebene vierte, die mit Blick auf Putin nicht unbedeutend ist. Sie lautet: Bevor Du Dich mit einer konkurrierenden Bande anlegst, musst Du sicher sein, dass Du dabei weder Deine Position oder Dein eigenes Gebiet gefährdest noch Deine Einnahmequellen verlierst. Denn so martialisch die Gangsterbosse auftreten und wirken mögen – sie wissen sehr genau einzuschätzen, worauf ihre Macht basiert und dass sie die Kühe, die sie melken, in ihrer Herde halten müssen.

Die Bosse der Straßengangs sind keine Selbstmörder. Wobei sie im äußersten Falle auch nicht vor irrationalen Handlungen zurückschrecken. Das allerdings geschieht nur dann, wenn ihr ureigenstes Territorium verloren zu gehen droht. Bis dahin aber sind sie immer auch Spieler, die ihre Karten dann ausspielen, wenn ihnen dieses einen Nutzen zu bringen scheint. Und – wie jeder Spieler – sind sie begnadete Bluffer. Mit unbewegter Miene demonstrieren sie Stärke, die das Gegenüber gefügig machen soll.

Selten wurde dieses deutlicher als bei jener Szene des Jahres 2007, als Putin in seiner Sommerresidenz die ihn besuchende Angela Merkel mit seiner Labrador-Hündin konfrontierte. Er wusste ganz genau: Seitdem Merkel von einem Hund gebissen worden war, fürchtete sie sich vor diesen, bat vor jeder Reise den künftigen Gastgeber, Hunde von ihr fern zu halten.

So verunsichert ein Leningrader Straßenjunge nach Außen ungewollt und unbefangen sein Gegenüber, demonstriert Stärke und scheinbare Überlegenheit. Und doch ist es nichts anderes als ein wohl kalkulierter Bluff. Was tatsächlich hinter diesem Bluff steht – das wird selbstverständlich niemals und niemandem verraten – auch und gerade nicht der eigenen Gang. Denn der Boss der Straßengang lebt von seinem Nimbus der Überlegenheit. Büßt er diesen ein, kann es mit ihm schnell vorbei sein.

Sein Elixier sind Anerkennung und Unterwerfung. Damit ersetzt er Freundschaft, zu der er nicht fähig ist, weil er sie in sein Sozialisation nicht erfahren konnte.

Putins Straßengang beherrscht Eurasien

Putin, der Straßenjunge aus Leningrad, lebt diese Regeln. Nur ist sein Viertel nicht begrenzt von Newa und Fontanka, sondern von Eismeer und Pazifik, Schwarzem Meer und Ostsee. An den Methoden hat das nichts geändert. Wer seinen Schutz sucht, ihn anerkennt und bezahlt, der kann getrost sein Ding machen. Die meisten Oligarchen hatten das schnell begriffen. Wer nicht, der gehörte zur falschen Gang und wurde niedergemacht.

Wer in der Nachbarschaft eine schwächere Gang führt, darf sich ihm unterwerfen. Vorausgesetzt, er akzeptiert uneingeschränkt seinen Vormachtanspruch, bereitet ihm keine Probleme und funktioniert auf Anforderung. Der Weißrusse Lukaschenko spielt nach diesen Regeln. Der Ukrainer Yanukovych wollte nach diesen Regeln spielen – und versagte. So gönnte der oberste Bandenboss im Kreml ihm, dem Versager, als nützlichem Idioten noch einen letzten Auftritt und hält ihn als möglichen Kronzeugen im goldenen Käfig. Eine bedeutende Rolle allerdings wird er in der Gang nie wieder spielen.

Wer einmal zu seiner Gang gehört oder von ihm als zugehörig gedacht wird, hat keinerlei Recht, sich einer anderen zuzuwenden. Den Herrschaftsanspruch seiner Gang hat Putin mit der von ihm 2011 offiziell ins Leben gerufenen Eurasischen Union festgeschrieben.

Es war der Fehler der Ukrainer, sich diesem Anspruch nicht zu unterwerfen. Für den Leningrader Straßenjungen, der sich mit nackten Oberkörper in der Pose eines machtvollen Siegers gefällt weil sie für ihn sein Hochkämpfen aus den sozialen Niederrungen der Mehrfamilienwohnung an die Spitze der Macht dokumentiert, war der Abfall der Ukraine in mehrfacher Hinsicht ein Desaster.

Putin, der wie alle Straßenjungs nach der Anerkennung durch die anderen Gangs fiebert, ließ sich von seinen Schutzbefohlenen mit Olympia die Arena bauen, die ihm ganz persönlich die internationale Bedeutung und Achtung schenken sollte, die ihm, dem mächtigsten Straßenjungen aller Zeiten, in seinem Selbstverständnis zusteht.

Das Versagen des Vasallen

Der Maidan und Yanukovych verhagelten ihm diese Anerkennung. Und mehr. Denn sie stellten ihn selbst als Bandenboss infrage. Boss ist nur, wer die uneingeschränkte Macht hat. Nach dessen Pfeife alle tanzen. Die Ukrainer tanzten nicht. Nicht mehr.

Es kam zu der Situation, in der europäische Diplomaten den Kontakt zu ihm aufnahmen um eine Lösung für die Krise zu finden. Es war ein Signal, das der Bandenboss zu würdigen wusste, auch wenn ihm dessen Ursache alles andere als angenehm war. So war denn auch die Lösung nicht uneingeschränkt in seinem Sinne – aber sie garantierte ihm Gesichtswahrung. Und die Chance, seinen Einfluss auf das Gebiet des kleinen Bandenunterbosses Yanukovych zu sichern. Die Nicht-Anerkennung dieser Vereinbarung durch den Maidan empfand der Bandenboss im Kreml als Verrat. Die Unfähigkeit der westlichen Verhandler, den Kompromiss durchzusetzen, als eklatantes Versagen und Schwäche. Und so tat der Bandenboss das, was Bandenbosse tun, wenn sie sich nicht nur verraten und in ihrer Ehre bedroht sehen, sondern auch die Gefahr wittern, es könnten an ihrer Macht Zweifel aufkommen: Er demonstrierte Macht. Und er demonstrierte sie nicht unkalkuliert und orientierungslos, sondern mit dem festen Ziel, das bislang nur locker angebundene Gebiet in sein Territorium aufzunehmen.

Keine adäquate Antwort

Das aber – und dieses verkennen die westeuropäischen und amerikanischen Diplomaten, Regierungschefs, Politiker und Politikberater – macht ihn berechenbar.

Putin pokert. Er pokert mit hohem Einsatz. Er kann das tun, weil er in seiner Hand das bessere Blatt wähnt. Und weil er gelernt hat, dass die Chefs der gegnerischen Gangs zwar die Klappe groß aufreißen, aber eine höllische Angst vor einem blauen Auge haben. Bevor sie es auf einen Bandenkrieg ankommen lassen, werden sie unter Absingen böser Beschimpfungen den Schwanz einklemmen. So sind sie für ihn, den großen Bandenboss Putin, letztlich alles Schwätzer ohne Eier, kläffende Hunde ohne Rückgrat, bestenfalls Angstbeißer. Sie werden ihn in seiner Einschätzung auch diesmal nicht enttäuschen.

Dabei wäre es ganz einfach, wenn sich die große Diplomatie von ihrer verwissenschaftlichten Theorie und dem französisch geprägten Florett befreien und ebenfalls wie eine Straßengang denken würde. Denn da gilt: Nur wer konsequent auftritt, wird auch akzeptiert.

Hätte die NATO auf Bitten der neuen ukrainischen Regierung beispielsweise ein paar leichte Truppenteile in Kiew und Umgebung stationiert, hätte Putin sich zwar verbal echauffieren können – doch gleichzeitig hätte er gewusst: Auch diese Gang meint es ernst. Dann hätte man auf Augenhöhe verhandeln können. Ohne Putins ureigenstes Territorium zu bedrohen. Mit dem offiziellen Mandat der neuen ukrainischen Regierung, die eigenen Sicherheitskräfte zu unterstützen und insbesondere den Schutz der Minderheiten zu garantieren, hätte die NATO die Argumente des gegnerischen Bandenbosses übernehmen und ihm damit den Wind aus den Segeln nehmen können.

Kein Bandenboss zieht in den unkalkulierbaren Krieg

Putin wären die Hände gebunden gewesen – und er hätte sich jeden weiteren Schritt fein säuberlich überlegt. Denn ein Bandenchef mag gut im Bluffen und gut im Drohen sein. Er weiß, wann er welche Karte zu spielen hat. Er ist auch bereit, kräftig zuzuschlagen, wenn er es für unumgänglich erachtet. Er wird aber niemals so weit gehen, mit seinem Handeln sein mühevoll in Besitz genommenes Territorium – und damit sich selbst – zu riskieren. Er wird sein Imperium, wird seine großen und kleinen Gangs und jene Freunde, die ihm die finanzielle Basis seiner Macht garantieren, niemals zur Disposition stellen oder stellen lassen. Als Leningrader Straßenjunge weiß er: Solange der Kanal nicht überschritten wird, ist Friede. Und solange seine Anhänger in ihrem wirtschaftlichen Wirken nicht über Gebühr beeinträchtigt werden, wird keiner seine Position gefährden. Kein Bandenboss darf die Entlohungsbereitschaft seiner Schutzbefohlenen unbegrenzt überdehnen. Genau dieses aber hat Putin gerade getan, indem er seine Oligarchen zur Finanzierung seiner olympischen Putin-Spiele heranzog. Hier droht ihm am ehesten Widerstand, wenn die Kosten für Bluffen und Drohen zu hoch werden sollten.

Auch deshalb wird ein Bandenboss einen finalen Krieg grundsätzlich nur dann führen, wenn er entweder keinen wirkungsvollen Gegenschlag zu befürchten hat oder er sich in seiner Existenz bedroht sieht. Ein Bandenboss zieht nur dann in den Bandenkrieg, wenn seine Bande unzweifelhaft stärker ist. Das aber ist die Bande Putins nicht – zumindest noch nicht. Und nicht, wenn die NATO als für ihn gegnerische Straßengang geschlossen auftritt. Solange man sich ihm jedoch nur mit Worthülsen und wirkungslosen Drohungen in den Weg zu stellen sucht, wird er sein Territorium ungerührt vergrößern. Denn Bandenbosse sind auch in dieser Frage berechenbar wie die Führer von Wolfsrudeln. Eine unbewachte Schafherde ist ein willkommenes Opfer. Stehen dort aber gut gefütterte, kräftige Schäferhunde, sucht man sich lieber ein anderes Ziel. Das Risiko, sich bei einem Angriff unheilbare Verletzungen zuzuziehen, ist viel zu groß und lohnt nicht.

Ein Wolf – kein Bär

Putin ist Russe. Aber er ist kein unberechenbarer Bär. Er ist ein Bandenboss mit dem Instinkt eines Wolfes. Dennoch lässt sich die westliche Politik von diesem Bild des Bären, der im vermeintlichen Abwehrkampf zu allem bereit ist, leiten. Und zieht aus der irrationalen Angst vor einem atomaren Krieg knurrend den Schwanz ein vor einem Wolf, der sich wohl kalkuliert mit erhobenen Vorderläufen aufrichtet, um als unberechenbarer Bär wahrgenommen zu werden.

Dabei wäre es so einfach. Nicht denken wie ein französischer Diplomat des achtzehnten Jahrhunderts. Sondern denken wie ein Bandenboss. Und handeln wie ein Bandenboss. Dabei das Kernterritorium des Gegners nicht bedrohen, nicht in Frage stellen.

Der Westen braucht einen Selfmademan

Was der Westen heute bräuchte, wäre ein Selfmademan aus der Bronx mit dem Instinkt der Straße. Jemanden, der Putins Sprache spricht. Stattdessen hat er einen Rechtsanwalt aus Chicago, der nicht einmal weiß, ob man einem Bandenboss die Hand geben darf.

Doch – man darf. Man muss sogar. Aber man muss bei der Begrüßung kräftig zudrücken können, um ernst genommen zu werden.

Weil die Politiker im Westen und ihre zahllosen, verkopften Berater dieses nicht begreifen, haben sie diesen Konflikt bereits eskalieren lassen, als sie Putins Raid Over Georgia hinnahmen. Sie werden auch den Konflikt um die Krim verlieren. Und ebenso all jene, die noch kommen werden.

Denn auch das ist eine Grundregel russischer Straßenjungs: Ein Bandenboss gibt sich nie zufrieden, solange er die Chance sieht, lohnenden Gewinn zu machen.

Warum sollte er auch.

Die in HIRAM7 REVIEW veröffentlichten Essays und Kommentare geben nicht grundsätzlich den Standpunkt der Redaktion wieder.


Aftermaths of the Ukraine Coup d’État: The new cold war between Russia and the U.S.

February 23, 2014

An Op-Ed by Narcisse Caméléon, deputy editor-in-chief

“The main foundations of every state, new states as well as ancient or composite ones, are good laws and good arms. You cannot have good laws without good arms, and where there are good arms, good laws inevitably follow.” Niccolò Machiavelli

NATO EXPANSION

Putin will probably address the U.S. missile shield, saying Russia would have to respond militarily if the United States continues to deploy elements of the shield to Eastern European countries (especially Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania, and now Ukraine).

In the past, Russia also accused NATO of building up naval forces in the Black Sea, though the United States cancelled plans to send a ship to the region.

The Black Sea is critical to Russian defense – the NATO does not have the ability to project power through land forces against Russia but has naval capacity to potentially limit Russian operations in the area. The best way to deal with Russia isn’t to attempt to isolate it, but to cooperate with it.

Anyway: the European people will likely pay the biggest price for the Coup d’État in Ukraine, as this conflict could lead to a civil war and to further instability in the continent.

Never touch a running system.

Let’s see what happens next.


The Meaning of Israel: A Personal View

January 15, 2014

In light of the obsessive, hypocritical focus by several scholarly groups taking aim at Israel, not to mention the permanent chorus of Israel’s detractors both here and abroad, David Harris wants to offer a totally different view of the Jewish state. This is a time to stand up and speak out.

An op-ed by David Harris
Executive Director of the American Jewish Committee
The Jerusalem Post, January 15, 2014

Against the backdrop of recent efforts in some academic circles to vilify and isolate Israel, let me put my cards on the table right up front. I’m not dispassionate when it comes to Israel. Quite the contrary.

The establishment of the state in 1948; the fulfillment of its envisioned role as home and haven for Jews from around the world; its wholehearted embrace of democracy and the rule of law; and its impressive scientific, cultural, and economic achievements are accomplishments beyond my wildest imagination.

For centuries, Jews around the world prayed for a return to Zion. We are the lucky ones who have seen those prayers answered. I am grateful to witness this most extraordinary period in Jewish history and Jewish sovereignty.

And when one adds the key element, namely, that all this took place not in the Middle West but in the Middle East, where Israel’s neighbors determined from day one to destroy it through any means available to them—from full-scale wars to wars of attrition; from diplomatic isolation to international delegitimation; from primary to secondary to even tertiary economic boycotts; from terrorism to the spread of anti-Semitism, often thinly veiled as anti-Zionism—the story of Israel’s first 65 years becomes all the more remarkable.

No other country has faced such a constant challenge to its very right to exist, even though the age-old biblical, spiritual, and physical connection between the Jewish people and the Land of Israel is unique in the annals of history.

Indeed,  that connection is of a totally different character from the basis on which, say, the United States, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, or the bulk of Latin American countries were established, that is, by Europeans with no legitimate claim to those lands who decimated indigenous populations and proclaimed their own authority. Or, for that matter, North African countries that were conquered and occupied by Arab-Islamic invaders and totally redefined in their national character.

No other country has faced such overwhelming odds against its very survival, or experienced the same degree of never-ending international demonization by too many nations that throw integrity and morality to the wind, and slavishly follow the will of the energy-rich and more numerous Arab states.

Yet Israelis have never succumbed to a fortress mentality, never abandoned their deep yearning for peace with their neighbors or willingness to take unprecedented risks to achieve that peace, never lost their zest for life, and never flinched from their determination to build a vibrant, democratic state.

This story of nation-building is entirely without precedent.

 Here was a people brought to the brink of utter destruction by the genocidal policies of Nazi Germany and its allies. Here was a people shown to be utterly powerless to influence a largely indifferent world to stop, or even slow down, the Final Solution. And here was a people, numbering barely 600,000, living cheek-by-jowl with often hostile Arab neighbors, under unsympathetic British occupation, on a harsh soil with no significant natural resources other than human capital in then Mandatory Palestine.

That the blue-and-white flag of an independent Israel could be planted on this land, to which the Jewish people had been intimately linked since the time of Abraham, just three years after the Second World War’s end—and with the support of a decisive majority of UN members at the time—truly boggles the mind.

And what’s more, that this tiny community of Jews, including survivors of the Holocaust who had somehow made their way to Mandatory Palestine despite the British blockade, could successfully defend themselves against the onslaught of five Arab standing armies that launched their attack on Israel’s first day of existence, is almost beyond imagination.

To understand the essence of Israel’s meaning, it is enough to ask how the history of the Jewish people might have been different had there been a Jewish state in 1933, in 1938, or even in 1941. If Israel had controlled its borders and the right of entry instead of Britain, if Israel had had embassies and consulates throughout Europe, how many more Jews might have escaped and found sanctuary?

Instead, Jews had to rely on the goodwill of embassies and consulates of other countries and, with woefully few exceptions, they found there neither the “good” nor the “will” to assist.

I witnessed firsthand what Israeli embassies and consulates meant to Jews drawn by the pull of Zion or the push of hatred. I stood in the courtyard of the Israeli embassy in Moscow and saw thousands of Jews seeking a quick exit from a Soviet Union in the throes of cataclysmic change, fearful that the change might be in the direction of renewed chauvinism and anti-Semitism.

Awestruck, I watched up-close as Israel never faltered, not even for a moment, in transporting Soviet Jews to the Jewish homeland, even as Scud missiles launched from Iraq traumatized the nation in 1991. It says a lot about the conditions they were leaving behind that these Jews continued to board planes for Tel Aviv while missiles were exploding in Israeli population centers. In fact, on two occasions I sat in sealed rooms with Soviet Jewish families who had just arrived in Israel during these missile attacks. Not once did any of them question their decision to establish new lives in the Jewish state. And equally, it says a lot about Israel that, amid all the pressing security concerns, it managed to continue to welcome these new immigrants without missing a beat.

And how can I ever forget the surge of pride—Jewish  pride—that  completely enveloped me in July 1976 on hearing the astonishing news of Israel’s daring rescue of the 106 Jewish hostages held by Arab and German terrorists in Entebbe, Uganda, over 2,000 miles from Israel’s borders? The unmistakable message: Jews in danger will never again be alone, without hope, and totally dependent on others for their safety.

Not least, I can still remember, as if it were yesterday, my very first visit to Israel. It was in 1970, and I was not quite 21 years old.

I didn’t know what to expect, but I recall being quite emotional from the moment I boarded the El Al plane to the very first glimpse of the Israeli coastline from the plane’s window. As I disembarked, I surprised myself by wanting to kiss the ground. In the ensuing weeks, I marveled at everything I saw. To me, it was as if every apartment building, factory, school, orange grove, and Egged bus was nothing less than a miracle. A state, a Jewish state, was unfolding before my very eyes.

After centuries of persecutions, pogroms, exiles, ghettos, pales of settlement, inquisitions, blood libels, forced conversions, discriminatory legislation, and immigration restrictions—and, no less, after centuries of prayers, dreams, and yearning—the Jews had come back home and were  the masters of their own fate.

I was overwhelmed by the mix of people, backgrounds, languages, and lifestyles, and by the intensity of life itself. Everyone, it seemed, had a compelling story to tell. There were Holocaust survivors with harrowing tales of their years in the camps. There were Jews from Arab countries, whose stories of persecution in such countries as Iraq, Libya, and Syria were little known at the time. There were the first Jews arriving from the USSR seeking repatriation in the Jewish homeland. There were the sabras—native-born Israelis—many of whose families had lived in Palestine for generations. There were local Arabs, both Christian and Muslim. There were Druze, whose religious practices are kept secret from the outside world. The list goes on and on.

I was moved beyond words by the sight of Jerusalem and the fervor with which Jews of all backgrounds prayed at the Western Wall. Coming from a nation that was at the time deeply divided and demoralized, I found my Israeli peers to be unabashedly proud of their country, eager to serve in the military, and, in many cases, determined to volunteer for the most elite combat units. They felt personally involved in the enterprise of building a Jewish state, more than 1,800 years after the  Romans defeated the Bar Kochba revolt,  the last Jewish attempt at sovereignty on this very land.

To be sure, nation-building is an infinitely complex process. In Israel’s case,  it began against a backdrop of tensions with a local Arab population that laid claim to the very same land, and tragically refused a UN proposal to divide the land into Arab and Jewish states; as the Arab world sought to isolate, demoralize, and ultimately destroy the state; as Israel’s population doubled in the first three years of the country’s existence, putting an unimaginable strain on severely limited resources; as the nation was forced to devote a vast portion of its limited national budget to defense expenditures; and as the country coped with forging a national identity and social consensus among a population that could not have been more geographically, linguistically, socially, and culturally heterogeneous.

Moreover, there is the tricky and underappreciated issue of the potential clash between the messy realities of statehood and, in this case, the ideals and faith of a people. It is one thing for a people to live their religion as a minority; it is quite another to exercise sovereignty as the majority population while remaining true to one’s ethical standards. Inevitably, tension will arise between a people’s spiritual or moral self-definition and the exigencies of statecraft, between our highest concepts of human nature and the daily realities of individuals in decision-making positions wielding power and balancing a variety of competing interests.

Even so, shall we raise the bar so high as to ensure that Israel—forced to function in the often gritty, morally ambiguous world of international relations and politics, especially as a small, still endangered state—will always fall short?

Yet, the notion that Israel would ever become ethically indistinguishable from any other country, reflexively seeking cover behind the convenient justification of realpolitik to explain its behavior, is equally unacceptable.

Israelis, with only 65 years of statehood under their belts, are among the newer practitioners of statecraft. With all its remarkable success, consider the daunting political, social, and economic challenges in the United States 65 or even 165 years after independence, or, for that matter, the challenges it faces today, including stubborn social inequalities. And let’s not forget that the United States, unlike Israel, is a vast country blessed with abundant natural resources, oceans on two-and-a half sides, a gentle neighbor to the north, and a weaker neighbor to the south.

Like any vibrant democracy, America is a permanent work in progress. The same holds true for Israel. Loving Israel as I do, though, doesn’t mean overlooking its shortcomings, including the excessive and unholy intrusion of religion into politics, the marginalization of non-Orthodox Jewish religious streams, the dangers posed by political and religious zealots, and the unfinished, if undeniably complex, task of integrating Israeli Arabs into the mainstream.

But it also doesn’t mean allowing such issues to overshadow Israel’s remarkable achievements, accomplished, as I’ve said, under the most difficult of circumstances.

In just 65 years, Israel has built a thriving democracy, unique in the region, including a Supreme Court prepared, when it deems appropriate, to overrule the prime minister or the military establishment, a feisty parliament that includes every imaginable viewpoint along the political spectrum, a robust civil society, and a vigorous press.

It has built an economy whose per capita GNP exceeds the combined total of its four contiguous sovereign neighbors—Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, and Syria.

It has built universities and research centers that have contributed to advancing the world’s frontiers of knowledge in countless ways, and won a slew of Nobel Prizes in the process.

It has built one of the world’s most powerful militaries—always under civilian control, I might add—to ensure its survival in a rough-and-tumble neighborhood. It has shown the world how a tiny nation, no larger than New Jersey or Wales, can, by sheer ingenuity, will, courage, and commitment, defend itself against those who would destroy it through conventional armies or armies of suicide bombers. And it has done all this while striving to adhere to a strict code of military conduct that has few rivals in the democratic world, much less elsewhere—in the face of an enemy prepared to send children to the front lines and seek cover in mosques, schools, and hospitals.

It has built a quality of life that ranks it among the world’s healthiest nations and with a particularly high life expectancy, indeed higher than that of the U.S.

It has built a thriving culture, whose musicians, writers, and artists are admired far beyond Israel’s borders. In doing so, it has lovingly taken an ancient language, Hebrew, the language of the prophets, and rendered it modern to accommodate the vocabulary of the contemporary world.

It has built a climate of respect for other faith groups, including Baha’i, Christianity and Islam, and their places of worship. Can any other nation in the area make the same claim?

It has built an agricultural sector that has had much to teach developing nations about turning an arid soil into fields of fruits, vegetables, cotton, and flowers.

Step back from the twists and turns of the daily information overload coming from the Middle East and consider the sweep of the last 65 years. Look at the light-years traveled since the darkness of the Holocaust, and marvel at the miracle of a decimated people returning to a tiny sliver of land—the land of our ancestors, the land of Zion and Jerusalem—and successfully building a modern, vibrant state against all the odds, on that ancient foundation.

In the final analysis, then, the story of Israel is the wondrous realization of a 3,500-year link among a land, a faith, a language, a people, and a vision. It is an unparalleled story of tenacity and determination, of courage and renewal.

And it is ultimately a metaphor for the triumph of enduring hope over the temptation of despair.


Von Winnetou zu Obama – Die Deutschen und der edle Wilde

January 11, 2014

von Tomas Spahn

Der Autor ist ein in Hamburg lebender Publizist und Politikwissenschaftler.

Ein roter Held

Winnetou ist ein Idol meiner Kindheit. Er stand für all das, was wir als Kinder sein wollten. Und vielleicht auch sein sollten.

Winnetou war ein Held. Nicht so einer von diesen Deppen, die laut schreiend in der ersten Reihe der Kriegsmaschinerie auf den Feind losrennen, um dann aufgebahrt und mit Orden versehen zwecks Beerdigung zu den Angehörigen zurück geschickt zu werden. Nein, ein echter Held. Obgleich – ganz zum Schluss … nein. Auch da bleibt Winnetou ein wahrer Held. Nicht einer, der sich mit Hurra für irgendeine imaginäre Idee wie Volk und Vaterland opfert, sondern einer, der mit Bedacht sein eigenes Leben für andere einsetzt, wohl ahnend, dass er es verlieren wird.

Dieser Tod eines wahren Helden aber ist es nicht allein.

Winnetou ist zuverlässig und pünktlich. Er verpasst keine Verabredung, und ist er doch  dazu gezwungen, so lässt er seinen Partner die alternativlosen Gründe wissen und gibt ihm Mitteilung, wann und wo das Treffen nachgeholt werden kann.

Winnetou ist uneingeschränkt ehrlich. Niemals würde er jemanden betrügen. Das ist einfach unter seiner Würde.

Winnetou ist gerecht. Niemals würde er gegen jemanden etwas unternehmen, der nichts gegen ihn unternommen hat.

Winnetou ist edelmütig. Er vergibt seinem Feind, selbst wenn dieser ihm das Leben nehmen wollte.

Winnetou ist altruistisch. Er opfert am Ende alles, was er hat, für andere. Ungerechtfertigt Böses tun – das kann Winnetou  nicht.

Winnetou ist nicht rassistisch. Er hilft jedem, der der Hilfe bedarf, unabhängig von dessen Rasse. Sogar dem Neger, der doch, wie Winnetous Erfinder Karl May nicht müde wird zu erwähnen, aus Sicht der Rasse des Winnetou weit unter diesem steht.

Und damit kommen wir zu dem, was Winnetou nicht ist.

Winnetou ist kein Weißer. Er ist ein Roter. Oder besser: Mitglied der indianischen Rasse, die, wie May betont, gleichsam gottgewollt zum Aussterben verdammt ist. Seine indianische Abstammung macht Winnetou unterscheidbar und es liefert eine Grundlage dafür, Menschen aufgrund ihrer Rasse in Schubladen zu stecken. May topft ihn zur Tarnung um, als Winnetou mit ihm Nordafrika bereist. Aus dem Athapasken, dem Apachen, wird ein Somali. Wohl bemerkt: Ein Somali – kein Neger. Denn offenbar sind Somali für May keine Schwarzen. Zumindest sind sie für ihn keine „Neger“.

Winnetou ist nicht zivilisiert. Er ist das, was man in der zweiten Hälfte des neunzehnten Jahrhunderts – und darüber hinaus – unter einem Wilden verstand. Oder besser: Winnetou war als Wilder geboren worden. Und als Indianer blieb er es bis zu seinem Tode. Nicht aber als Mensch.

Winnetou wohnt nicht in Städten. Obgleich der Pueblo-Bau, den May irrtümlich als seinen Heimatort vorstellt – denn die Apachen waren keine Pueblo-Indianer – eine städtische Struktur bereits erahnen lässt.

Winnetou geht keiner geregelten Arbeit nach. Er ist der Häuptling seines spezifischen Apachenstammes der Mescalero – und er wird von fast allen Stämmen der Apachen als ihr ideelles Oberhaupt anerkannt, was ebenfalls an der Wirklichkeit vorbei geht, da die südlichen Athapasken durchaus einander feindlich gesinnte Gruppen bildeten. Betrachtet man im Sinne Mays die Apachen als eine Nation, so ist Winnetou ein indianischer Kaiser. Entsprechend edel und rein ist sein Charakter – obgleich Karl May damit an der Wirklichkeit europäischer Kaiser meilenweit vorbeiläuft. Aber das steht auf einem anderen Blatt.

Winnetou zieht durch seine Welt, um Gutes zu tun. Da ist er ein wenig wie Jesus. Auch wenn er keine Wunder tut, so ist er doch alles in allem wunder-voll. In einem Satz:

Winnetou ist genau das, als was er in die Literatur eingehen sollte und eingegangen ist: Das Idealbild des Edlen Wilden. Oder?

Zwischen Romantik und Gründerzeit

Werfen wir einen Blick auf Winnetous Schöpfer, den Sachsen Karl May. Nur selten hat Deutschland einen derart phantasiebegabten Schriftsteller wie ihn hervorgebracht. Und jemanden, der so wie er selbst zu einer der Figuren wurde, die er in seinen Romanen beschrieb.

May war ein Kind seiner Zeit. Er war ein Romantiker, dessen kleine Biedermeierwelt über Nacht in das globale Weltgeschehen geschubst worden war. Seine gedankliche Reise in die scheinbare Realität fremder Länder ist dabei eher Schein als Sein. Er verarbeitete die neue Welt in seinen Romanen, immer auf der Suche nach dem Weg aus dem Biedermeier in eine neue Zeit, ohne dabei die Ideale seiner romantischen Introvertiertheit aufgeben zu wollen, aufgeben zu können.

May war obrigkeitsgläubig – und doch war er es nur so lange, wie die Obrigkeit das Richtige tat. Richtig war für May das, was aus seiner Interpretation des Christentums heraus Gottes Willen entsprach. Die Überzeugung, dass ein höheres Wesen die Geschicke der Welt lenke, ist unverrückbar mit May verknüpft. Aus diesem Glauben heraus muss das Gute immer siegen und das Böse immer verlieren, denn wäre es anders, hätte Mays Gott versagt. Das aber kann ein Gott nicht. Doch Mays Gott gibt dem Menschen Spielraum. Mays Gottesglaube ist nicht der an ein unverrückbares Schicksal. Der Mensch hat es selbst in der Hand, seine persönliche Nähe zu dem einen Gott zu gestalten. An dessen endgültigen Sieg über das Böse aber lässt May nie auch nur den Hauch eines Zweifels aufkommen.

Was für die mystische Welt des Glaubens gilt, gilt für May auch für die Politik. May war kaisertreu und undemokratisch. May macht dieses nicht an den Großen der Welt fest. Es ist sein Old Shatterhand oder sein Kara ben Nemsi, der undemokratisch agiert. Demokratie behindert seine Hauptakteure, behindert ihn in der Entscheidungsfindung. In den wenigen Fällen, in denen demokratische Mehrheitsentscheide die Position des Romanhelden überstimmen, endet dieses regelmäßig in einer Katastrophe. Dennoch war May nicht im eigentlichen Sinne totalitär, eher patriarchalisch. Er zwang niemanden, sich seinem Urteil zu unterwerfen, stellte allerdings gleichzeitig fest, dass er mit jenen, die dieses nicht taten, nichts mehr zu tun haben wolle, weil sie das Richtige nicht erkennten. Es ist in gewisser Weise ein alttestamentarischer Ansatz, den May vertritt. Die von der Natur – und damit von Gott – eingesetzte Führungsperson tut allein schon deshalb das Richtige, weil sie auf Gottes Wegen schreitet. Und weil dieses so ist, ist es selbstverständlich, dass alle anderen Vernünftigen dieser Führungsperson folgen. Auf die Unvernünftigen kann man dann gern verzichten.

May war nicht nur ein Großdeutscher – er war ein Gesamtdeutscher. Das war nicht selbstverständlich zu seiner Zeit, als das Zusammenbringen der Deutschen Kleinstaaten unter dem Preußischen König als Kaiser keine zwanzig Jahre zurück lag. Es war noch weniger selbstverständlich für einen Sachsen, dessen lebenslustiges Kleinreich immer wieder Opfer der asketischen Nachbarn im Norden geworden war. Doch May stand hier fest und unverrückbar in der Tradition der pangermanistischen Burschenschaften: „Von der Maaß bis an die Memel, von der Etsch bis an den Belt …”

May war auch Europäer. Trotz des noch nicht lange zurückliegenden Französisch-Preußischen Krieges, aus dem ein Kleindeutsch-Französischer wurde, stehen ihm von allen Europäern die Franzosen am nächsten. Dänen und Holländer gehören dagegen fast schon automatisch zur germanischen Familie. Und die Österreicher sowieso.

Insofern wird man May vielleicht am ehesten gerecht, wenn man ihn als Gemanopäer bezeichnet. Geschichtlich bewandert ging er davon aus, dass zumindest die westeuropäischen Völker sämtlichst germanischen Ursprungs waren, auch wenn bei den Südeuropäern der römische Einfluss unverkennbar blieb. Das einte.

May war kein Rassist. Zumindest nicht in dem Sinne, wie wir diesen Begriff heute verstehen. Und dennoch war er alles andere als frei von Rassevorurteilen. Wenn er das Bild des Negers aus der Sicht des Indianers zeichnet, dann zeichnet er damit auch sein eigenes. Für May ist der Bewohner Afrikas in gewisser Weise eine Art des menschlichen Urtypus. Ungebildet, unzivilisiert. Aber unzweifelhaft ein Mensch – keine Sache, die man zum Sklaven machen darf. Mays Neger kann mit Hilfe des zivilisierten Weißen in die Lage versetzt werden, zumindest Anschluss zu finden. Wenn er auch nie in der Lage sein wird, intellektuell an die Fähigkeiten des Weißen heranzureichen. Deswegen sprechen die Schwarzen, die bei Karl May auftreten, grundsätzlich ein Art Stammeldeutsch. Es hat etwas von Babysprache – und es charakterisiert damit gleichzeitig den May’schen Genotyp des Negers: Ausgestattet mit einen hohen Maß an emotionaler Wärme, aber unselbstständig und der permanenten Anleitung bedürftig. Gleichwohl anerkennt er – fast schon ungläubig – den militärischen Erfolg der südostafrikanischen Zulu.

Das ist bei dem Indianer anders. Als Leser spürt man den Unterschied zwischen roter und schwarzer Rasse ständig. Auch Mays Indianer bedürfen der lenkenden Führung durch den weißen Mann. Auch Mays Indianer sprechen eine Art Stammeldeutsch – aber es ist ein literarisches Stammeldeutsch. Anders als der Schwarze hat der Indianer das Potential, dem Weißen ebenbürtig zu werden. May erkennt, ohne dieses jemals explizit zuzugeben, dass der vorgebliche Wilde Amerikas eigentlich genau dieses nicht ist: Ein Wilder.

May anerkennt eine eigenständige, indianische Kultur, die nur des deutschen Einflusses bedarf, um sich auf die gleiche Stufe mit dem Deutschen zu erheben. Unterschwellig schwingt dabei immer das Bedauern mit, dass Deutschland viel zu spät seine weltrettende Mission entdeckt habe. Wären es Deutsche gewesen und nicht Angelsachsen, die den Norden Amerikas besiedelten – was hätte aus den Wilden werden können. Denn anders als Mays Neger sind seine Indianer eben nicht zivilisationslos.

Vom Romantiker zum Zivilisationskritiker

May selbst wird von Roman zu Roman mehr zum Zivilisationskritiker. Er, dessen Geschichten zwischen 1870 und 1910 entstanden, erkennt den brutalen Gegensatz zwischen den kommerziellen Interessen der angelsächsisch geprägten Yankees und den naturverbundenen, akapitalistischen Indianern, die für ihn immer weniger Wilde sind, sondern eine von unehrenhaften Interessen weißer Raubritter in ihrer Existenz bedrohte, eigene Zivilisation.

Den Wandel, den May in seinem Verhältnis zum Wilden Nordamerikas – und ausschließlich zu diesem – durchlebt, durchlebt auch seine Romanfigur. Zwei Deutsche sind es, die aus dem Naturkind Winnetou einen edlen Wilden formen – der 1848-Altrevolutionär Klekih-Petra und Mays romantisches Ich selbst. Bald schon ist Winnetou nur noch pro forma ein Wilder. Tatsächlich ist sein Verhalten in vielem deutlich zivilisierter als das der mit ihm konkurrierenden Weißen – zumindest soweit diese angelsächsischen Ursprungs sind. Und eigentlich ist Winnetou am Ende nicht einmal mehr ein Vertreter seiner „roten” Rasse. Er stirbt bei dem erfolgreichen Versuch, seine deutschen Freunde zu retten. Im Todeskampf singt ihm ein deutscher Chor ein letztes Lied, geleitet ihn in die Ewigkeit, die er, der einstmals Wilde, nun wie ein guter Deutscher als Christ betritt. „Schar-lih, ich glaube an den Heiland. Winnetou ist ein Christ.“ So lautet der letzte Satz, den der Sterbende spricht. May rettet seinen erdachten Blutsbruder so nicht nur für die Deutschen, er rettet ihn auch für das göttliche Himmelsreich. Winnetou, so diese letzte Botschaft seines Schöpfers, ist einer von uns. Er ist ein Deutscher. Ein guter Deutscher, denn er ist ein Christ. Ein edler Deutscher, denn er ist ein wahrer Christ. Er ist ein solcher Deutscher, wie ein Deutscher in Mays Idealbild eigentlich sein sollte.

Insofern ist jeder, der May dumpfen Rassismus vorwirft, auf dem Holzwege. Mag er in seinem Bild des Afrikaners von der zeitgenössisch vorherrschenden Auffassung des Negers als unterrichtungsbedürftigem Kind geprägt sein, mag seine konfessionell begründete Abneigung gegen Vertreter der Ostkirchen mehr noch als gegen Vertreter des Islam unverkennbar sein und mag er der Vorstellung seiner Zeit folgen, wonach die weiße Rasse von der Natur – und damit von Gott – dazu ausersehen sei, die Welt zu führen – mit der Figur des Winnetou öffnet er dem Wilden den Weg, zu einem Zivilisierten, zu einem Deutschen, zu werden. Vielleicht sogar etwas zu sein, das besser ist als ein Deutscher.

Trotzdem und gerade weil er in seinem inneren Kern nun ein Deutscher ist, bleibt Winnetou, diese wunderbare und idealisierte Schöpfung eines Übermenschen, im Bewusstsein seiner Leser die Inkarnation des edlen Wilden. Und sie verändert den Leser dabei selbst. Denn in dem zivilisierten Kind, dem angepassten Erwachsenen, entfaltet dieser edle Wilde eine eigene Wirkung. Wer in sich Gutes spürt, der wird den Versuch unternehmen, immer auch ein wenig wie Winnetou zu sein. Es ist diese gedachte Mischung aus unangepasster Ursprünglichkeit und geistig-kultureller Überlegenheit, aus instinktivem Gerechtigkeitsgefühl und dem charakterlichen Edelmut der gebildeten Stände, die ihre Faszination entfaltet. Sie machen den eigentlichen Kern des Winnetou aus.

Der wilde Deutsche und der deutsche Wilde

Indem May ab 1890 diese enge Verbundenheit zwischen dem Wilden aus dem Westen der USA nicht mit den Weißen, sondern mit den Deutschen herauskristallisiert und im wahrsten Sinne des Wortes romantisiert, stellt er unterschwellig fest: Wir sind uns ähnlicher, als wir glauben. Ohne explizit England-feindlich zu sein, verdammt May so auch die imperialistische Landnahme aus kommerziellen Interessen, verurteilt den englischen Expansionismus, indem er ihn zu einer Grundeigenschaft der europäischen Nordamerikaner macht.

In gewisser Weise wird so auch der Einstieg des den jungen May darstellenden Old Shatterhand zu einer Allegorie. Als Kind der europäischen Zivilisation hat er kein Problem damit, im Auftrag der Landdiebe tätig zu werden, die eine transkontinentale Bahnverbindung durch das Apachenland führen wollen. Das historische Vorbild wird May in der ab 1880 geplanten Southern Pacific Verbindung gefunden haben. Erst Stück für Stück wird dem Romanhelden das Verbrecherische seiner Tat bewusst – in der Konfrontation mit jenen Wilden, deren Land geraubt werden soll und geraubt werden wird und die sich dennoch schon hier als die edleren Menschen erweisen, indem sie ihrem dann weißen Bruder die Genehmigung geben, die Ergebnisse seiner Arbeit, die ausschließlich dem Ziel dienen, sie, die rechtlosen Wilden, zu bedrängen, an die Landdiebe zu verkaufen und damit seinen Vertrag zu erfüllen.

Um wie viel einfacher wäre es gewesen, Scharlih, wie sich May von seinen erdachten Brüdern nennen lässt, das Gold zu geben, das den Ausfall der Entlohnung hätte ersetzen können. Doch auch hier bleibt der Hochstapler May ein guter Deutscher: pacta sunt servanda.

Gleichwohl manifestiert sich hier der Bruch des Schriftstellers zwischen der deutschen Kultur und der angelsächsischen. Wir, die Deutschen, sind keine Imperialisten. Wir, die Deutschen, sind nicht die Räuber. Wir sind vielmehr jene, die den Wilden dabei helfen, so zu werden wie wir bereits sind. Das ist in einer Zeit, die geprägt war vom Bewusstsein der absoluten Überlegenheit der weißen Rasse, fast schon revolutionär. Und es war gleichzeitig reaktionär, weil es dennoch die Unterlegenheit der Kulturen der Wilden als selbstverständlich voraussetzte. Darüber hinaus liefert May eine perfekte Begründung des einsetzenden deutschen Kolonialismus.

Nicht Gewinnstreben ist des Deutschen Ziel in der Welt der Landräuber, sondern Zivilisationsvermittlung. Wir, diese Deutschen, gehen nicht in die Welt, um Land zu stehlen oder Menschen zu unterwerfen – unsere Ziele sind hehr, und wenn wir auf andere Völker treffen, dann ist es unser Ziel, sie auf die gleiche Ebene der Kultur zu heben, über die wir selbst verfügen. In gewisser Weise entspricht dieses dem Weltbild, das Mays Kaiser am 2. Juli 1900 seinem Expeditionsheer mit auf den Weg nach China gibt: „Ihr habt gute Kameradschaft zu halten mit allen Truppen, mit denen ihr dort zusammenkommt. … wer es auch sei, sie fechten alle für die eine Sache, für die Zivilisation.“ Wilhelm II. war bereit, für diese Zivilisation auch den Massenmord zu befehlen. Das unterschied ihn vom gereiften May.

Den Umgang des belgischen Königs Leopold 2 mit „seinem” Kongo muss May – sollte er um ihn gewusst haben – ebenso zutiefst verurteilt haben, wie ihm die Versklavung der „armen Neger” durch die Araber und die Türken ein Gräuel war. Spätestens der Völkermord an den Herero im deutschen Südwestafrika, der eine erschreckende Ähnlichkeit mit dem einzigen Massenmord des Winnetou im zweiten Teil der Winnetou-Trilogie aufweist, widersprach diesem Ideal eklatant. May selbst äußerte sich dazu nicht mehr  – vielleicht auch deshalb, weil er selbst dieser Welt schon zu entrückt war. Seine einzige Geschichte, die im Süden Afrikas spielt, fällt als Ich-Erzählung des 1842 in Radebeul geborenen Schriftstellers in die späten 1830er Jahre. Seinen letzten Roman hatte May 1910 veröffentlicht – seit 1900 waren seine Erzählungen nicht mehr wirklich von dieser Welt.

Doch das Bild des Edlen Wilden sollte sich dank May unverrückbar im kollektiven deutschen Unterbewusstsein verankern. Es war seitdem immer fest mit dem nordamerikanischen „Wilden“ verknüpft und bot einer Verklärung Vorschub, die manchmal fast schon pseudoreligiösen Charakter annahm. Winnetou blieb unserem Bewusstsein erhalten. Sollte er jemals in die Gefahr geraten sein, vergessen zu werden, so holten ihn die zahllosen B-Movies, die mit einer Titelfigur seines Namens in Annäherung an manchen Inhalt des Karl May in den sechziger Jahren des zwanzigsten Jahrhunderts produziert wurden, zurück in seine rund achtzig Jahre zuvor gedachte Rolle. Zwanzig Jahre nach Kriegsende, nach dieser vernichtenden Niederlage der Deutschen gegen das Angelsächsische, gab dieser Winnetou den moralisch zerstörten Deutschen erneut das Bild einer moralischen Instanz – und auch hier wieder ist der Edle Wilde am Ende mehr der edle Deutsche als der Amerikaner. Was Karl May nicht einmal erahnen konnte – nach der Fast-Vernichtung des Deutschen wurde sein Romanheld derjenige, der unverfänglich weil eben in seiner Herkunft nicht Deutsch die deutschen Tugenden aufgreifen und repräsentieren konnte. Die Tatsache, dass die Filmfigur von einem Franzosen gespielt wurde, unterstrich die Unangreifbarkeit des Deutschen in dieser Figur des Edlen Wilden.

Das Bild vom guten Amerikaner

Winnetou und mit ihm May prägte erneut das Bild einer Generation von dem edlen Uramerikaner, indem er diesen zum eigentlichen Träger deutscher Primärtugenden verklärte. War auch der Yankee in den sechziger Jahren noch derjenige, der, je nach Sichtweise, Deutschland von Hitler befreit oder entscheidend zur Niederlage Deutschlands beigetragen hatte – wobei das eine wie das andere nicht voneinander zu trennen war  – so war der von den Yankees bedrängte Wilde doch das eigentliche Opfer eben dieses Yankee, der immer weniger das Wohl des anderen als vielmehr das eigene im Auge hatte. Unbewusst schlich sich so in die Winnetou-Filme auch eine unterschwellige Kritik am Yankee-Kapitalismus ein, ohne dass man sie deswegen als anti-amerikanisch hätte bezeichnen können. Ob in den Romanen oder in den nachempfundenen Filmen gilt: Die wirklich Bösen, die moralisch Verwerflichen sind niemals Deutsche. Sind es nicht ohnehin schon durch und durch verderbte Kreaturen, deren konkrete Nationalität keine Rolle spielt, so sind es skrupellose Geschäftsleute mit unzweifelhaftem Yankee-Charakter. Vielleicht war dieses auch ein ausschlaggebender Grund, weshalb die DDR-Führung, die mit dem kaisertreuen Sachsen wenig anzufangen wusste, darauf verzichtete, seine Bücher aus den Regalen zu verbannen.

Im Westen Deutschlands verklärte der Blick auf die vor der Tür stehende imperialistische Sowjetarmee das Bild des Amerikaners. War die Deutsch-Sowjetische Freundschaft in den mitteldeutschen Ländern eine staatliche Order, die kaum gelebt wurde, so wurde die deutsch-amerikanische Freundschaft im Westen zu einer gelebten Wirklichkeit. Ähnlich wie schon zu Mays Zeiten zeichnete sich der Deutsche einmal mehr durch ein gerüttelt Maß an Naivität aus. Er verwechselte Interessengemeinschaft zwischen Staaten mit Freundschaft zwischen Völkern.

Uncle Sam, der schon auf seinem Rekrutierungsplakat aus dem Ersten Weltkrieg Menschen fing, um sie für ihr Land in den Tod zu schicken, wurde im Bewusstsein der Nachkriegsdeutschen/West nicht zuletzt dank Marshall-Plan zum altruistischen Onkel Sam aus Amerika.

Das verklärte Bild des US-Amerikaners Winnetou, dieses Edlen Wilden, der so viele erwünschte deutsche Eigenschaften in sich trug, mag dieser Idealisierung Vorschub geleistet haben. Die Tatsache, dass bei der US-amerikanischen Nachkriegspolitik selbstverständlich immer US-Interessen den entscheidenden Ausschlag gaben, wurde von den Deutschen/West gezielt verdrängt. In der ihnen eigenen Gemütlichkeit, für das die angelsächsische Sprache kein Pendant kennt, verklärten sie den früheren Kriegsgegner erst zum Retter und dann zum Freund. Doch die Verklärung sollte Risse bekommen. Und der Entscheidende entstand in jenen sechziger Jahren, die auch die Wiederauferstehung des Winnetou feierten.

Mochte die deutsche Volksseele den US-amerikanischen Kampf in Vietnam anfangs noch als Rettungsaktion vor feindlicher Diktatur gesehen haben – die unmittelbare Position an einer der zu erwartenden Hauptkampflinien zwischen den Systemen vermochte diese Auffassung ebenso zu befördern wie der immer noch im Hinterkopf steckende zivilisatorische Anspruch an Kolonisierung – so wurde, je länger der Krieg dauerte, desto deutlicher, dass es nicht nur hehre Ziele waren, die die USA bewegten, sich in Vietnam zu engagieren. Das Bild vom lieben Onkel Sam aus Amerika bekam Flecken. Mehr und mehr erinnerte das US-amerikanische Vorgehen gegen die unterbewaffneten Dschungelkämpfer der Vietkong und Massaker wie das von MyLai an die Einsätze der US-Kavallerie gegen zahlenmäßig und waffentechnisch unterlegene Stämme der indigenen Amerikaner. Die indianischen Aktionen, die 1973 das Massaker von Wounded Knee in Erinnerung brachten, taten ein weiteres, um die unrühmliche Geschichte der Kolonisierung des Westens der USA in Erinnerung zu rufen.

Sahen sich die deutschen Konservativen fest an der Seite ihrer transatlantischen Freunde im globalen Kampf des Guten gegen das Böse, so verklärte die Linke den Dschungelkämpfer zu edlen Wilden, die sich mit dem Mut der Verzweiflung gegen die Kolonialismuskrake des Weltkapitalismus zur Wehr setzte. Idealbildern, die mit der Wirklichkeit wenig zu tun hatten, folgten beide.

Zu einem tiefen Graben sollte dieser in Vietnam entstandene Riss werden, als mit Bush 2 die Marionette des Yankee-Kapitalismus in einen Krieg ums Öl zog. Hier nun war es wieder, das Bild des ausschließlich auf seinen Profit bedachten Yankee – das Bild des hässlichen Amerikaners, der den Idealen des guten Deutschen so fern stand, dass in den Augen der Deutschen der von ihm bedrängte Wilde allemal der wertvollere Mensch war. In diese Situation, die ein fast schon klassisches Karl-May-Bild zeichnete, platzte 2009 die Wahl des Barack Obama als 44. Präsident der Vereinigten Staaten.

Vom Mulatten zum Messias

Dieser im traditionellen Sinne als Mulatte zu bezeichnende Mann, dessen schwarzafrikanischer Vater aus Kenia und dessen Mutter als klassisch amerikanische Nachkommin von Iren, Engländern und Deutschen aus dem kleinstbürgerlich geprägten Kernland der USA stammte, entfachte bei den Deutschen etwas, das ich als positivistischen Rassismus bezeichnen möchte. Allen voran der Anchorman der wichtigsten öffentlich-rechtlichen Newsshow wurde nicht müde, diesen „ersten farbigen Präsidenten der USA” in den höchsten Tönen zu feiern. Wie sehr er und mit ihm alle, die in das gleiche Horn stießen, ihren tief in ihnen verankerten Rassismus auslebten, wurde ihnen nie bewusst. Denn tatsächlich ist die Reduzierung des Mulatten, der ebenso weiß wie schwarz ist, auf seinen schwarzen Teil nichts anderes als eine gedankliche Fortsetzung nationalsozialistischer Rassegesetze. Der Deutsche, dessen Eltern zur Hälfte arisch und zur anderen Hälfte semitisch – oder eben zur einen Hälfte deutsch und zur anderen Hälfte jüdisch – waren, wurde auf seinen jüdischen Erbteil reduziert. Als vorgeblicher Mischling zweier Menschenrassen  – als „Bastard” – durfte er eines nicht mehr sein: Weißer, Arier, Europäer, Deutscher. Wenn der Nachrichtenmoderator den Mulatten Obama auf seine schwarzafrikanischen Gene reduzierte, mag man dieses vielleicht noch damit zu begründen versuchen, dass die äußere Anmutung des US-Präsidenten eher der eines schwarzen als der eines weißen Amerikaners entspricht. Aber auch dieses offenbart bereits den unterschwelligen Rassismus, der sich bei der deutschen Berichterstattung über Obama Bahn gebrochen hatte.

Ich sprach von einem positivistischen Rassismus – was angesichts der innerdeutschen Rassismusdebatte, die zwangsläufig aus dem Negerkuss einen Schaumkuss und aus dem „schwarzen Mann” des Kinderspiels einen Neger macht, fast schon wie ein Oxymoron wirkt. Doch der Umgang mit dem noch nicht und dem frisch gewählten Obama offenbarte genau diesen positivistischen Rassismus. Indem er den weißen Anteil ausblendete, schob er das möglicherweise Negative im Charakter dieses Mannes ausschließlich auf dessen „weiße“ Gene – und aus dem kollektiven Bewusstsein. Als Schwarzer – denn ein Neger durfte er nicht mehr sein – löste Obama sich von all dem, was die Deutschen an Yankeeismus an ihren transatlantischen „Freunden” kritisierten. Als aus dem schwarzen US-Amerikaner der erste farbige US-Präsident wurde, konnte das immer noch in deutschen Hinterköpfen herumspukende Idealbild des im Norden Amerikas anzutreffenden Edlen Wilden seinen direkten Weg finden zur Verknüpfung des eigentlich schon deutschen Winnetou mit dem nicht-weißen Nordamerikaner Obama. Der Mulatte wurde zur lebenden Inkarnation der May’schen Romanfigur. Den Schritt vom unzivilisierten zum zivilisierten Wilden hatte er bereits hinter sich. Zumindest der nordamerikanische Neger saß nicht mehr als Sklave in einer Hütte an den Baumwollfeldern, um tumb und ungebildet sein Dasein zu fristen. Er war in der weißen Zivilisation angekommen. Aber er war kein Yankee – und er war auch nicht der „Uncle Sam“, der den Deutschen vorschwebte, wenn er an „den Ami“ dachte.

Mit seinem eloquenten Auftreten, mit seiner so unverkennbar anderen Attitüde als der der Yankee-Inkarnation Georg Walker Bush, wurde dieser Barack Obama im Bewusstsein seiner deutschen Fans zu einem würdigen Nachfolger Winnetous. Die Deutschen liebten diesen Obama so, wie sie – vielleicht unbewusst – immer Winnetou, den Edlen Wilden, der eigentlich ein Deutscher ist, geliebt hatten. Sie liebten ihn nicht zuletzt deshalb über alle politischen Lager hinweg – von grün über rot bis schwarz. Sie liebten ihn aber auch, weil er den in ihnen wohnenden Rassismus so perfekt in eine positive Bahn lenken konnte, in der aus der unterschwelligen Angst vor dem Fremden, etwas Positives, die andere Rasse überhöhendes, werden konnte.

Obama als der Edle Wilde, als der Winnetou der Herzen, wurde automatisch auch zu einem von uns. Denn wenn der Edle Wilde Winnetou als Deutscher stirbt, weil er eigentlich schon immer einer gewesen ist – dann musste auch Obama in seinem Charakter ein Deutscher und kein Yankee sein. Mit seinem spektakulären Auftritt an der Berliner Siegessäule hatte er diese Botschaft unbewusst aber erfolgreich in die Herzen der Deutschen gelegt.

Die Deutschen stellten sich damit selbst die Falle auf, in der sie sich spätestens 2013 unrettbar verfangen sollten. Denn sie hatten verkannt, dass dieser Heilsbringer, dieser Edle Wilde aus dem Norden Amerikas, in erster Linie nichts anderes war als ein US-amerikanischer Politiker wie tausende vor ihm. Und eben ein US-amerikanischer Präsident wie dreiundvierzig vor ihm. Auch ein Obama kochte nur mit Wasser. Auch ein Obama unterlag den Zwängen des tagtäglichen Politikgeschehens. Auch ein Obama stand unter dem Druck, den die Plutokraten der USA ausüben konnten.

Denkt man in historischen Kategorien, dann war es Obamas größter Fehler, nicht in dem ersten Jahr seiner Amtszeit von einem fanatischen weißen Amerikaner ermordet worden zu sein. Wäre ihm dieses zugestoßen – nicht nur die Deutschen, aber diese ganz besonders, hätten den Mulatten Obama zu einer gottesähnlichen Heilsfigur stilisiert, gegen die die Ikone Kennedy derart in den Hintergrund hätte treten müssen, dass man sie ob ihrer Blässe bald nicht mehr wahrgenommen hätte. Dieser Obama hätte das Format gehabt, zu einem neuen Messias zu werden.

Es sei dem Menschen Obama und seiner Familie selbstverständlich gegönnt, nicht Opfer eines geisteskranken Fanatikers geworden zu sein. Sein idealisiertes Bild des Edlen Wilden, des farbigen Messias, der angetreten war, die Welt vor sich selbst zu retten, ging darüber jedoch in die Brüche.

Spätestens, als die NSA-Veröffentlichungen des Edward Snowden auch dem letzten Deutschen klar machten, dass die deutsche Freundschaft zu Amerika eine sehr einseitige, der deutschen Gemütlichkeit geschuldete Angelegenheit gewesen war, zerbrach das edle Bild des Winnetou Obama in Tausende von Scherben.

Es war mehr als nur Enttäuschung, die die Reaktionen auf die Erkenntnis erklären hilft, dass der Edle Wilde Winnetou niemals mehr war als das im Kopf eines Spätromantikers herumspukende Idealbild des besseren Deutschen – und auch nie mehr sein konnte. Diese Erkenntnis traf die Deutschen wie ein Schlag mit dem Tomahawk.

Die wahre Welt, so wurde den romantischen Deutschen schlagartig bewusst, kann sich Winnetous nicht leisten.

Und so ist Winnetou nun wieder das Idealbild eines Edlen Wilden, der eigentlich ein Deutscher ist, und der doch niemals Wirklichkeit werden kann. Und Obama ist ein US-amerikanischer Präsident, der ebenso wenig ein Messias ist, wie dieses seine zahlreichen Vorgänger waren und seine Nachfolger sein werden.

Die in HIRAM7 REVIEW veröffentlichten Essays und Kommentare geben nicht grundsätzlich den Standpunkt der Redaktion wieder.


Thomas Hardy’s great poem on the turn of the year

December 27, 2013

thomas-hardy-grave

The Darkling Thrush

I leant upon a coppice gate
When Frost was spectre-gray,
And Winter’s dregs made desolate
The weakening eye of day.
The tangled bine-stems scored the sky
Like strings of broken lyres,
And all mankind that haunted nigh
Had sought their household fires.

The land’s sharp features seemed to be
Century’s corpse outleant,
His crypt the cloudy canopy,
The wind his death-lament.
The ancient pulse of germ and birth
Was shrunken hard and dry,
And every spirit upon earth
Seemed fervorless as I.

At once a voice arose among
The bleak twigs overhead
In a full-hearted evensong
Of joy illimited;
An aged thrush, frail, gaunt, and small
In blast-beruffled plume,
Had chosen thus to fling his soul
Upon the growing gloom.

So little cause for carolings
Of such ecstatic sound
Was written on terrestrial things
Afar or nigh around,
That I could think there trembled through
His happy good-night air
Some blessed Hope, whereof he knew
And I was unaware.

31 December 1900

Thomas Hardy (1840-1928)


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 48 other followers